Tag Archives: vi cricket

Metro Cricket 2019 Results

Metro Cricket Team Win Heindrich Swanepoel Memorial Cup 2019!

Metro Team Cricket Season Results

these results obtained from the  www.bcew.co.uk website

 

BCEW National League

 

Saturday 18th May

London Metro v Northants Steelbacks
Metro: 261/9 declared (30 overs), M Dean 74, R Field 52, M Turnham 4-83, C Ross 2-19
Northants: 42/2 (7.4 overs), S Miah 31*, G Jones 2-10
Match Drawn after play was abandoned due to rain
Points: Metro 10, Northants 10

 

Saturday 1st June

London Metro v Sussex Sharks
Sussex were unable to fulfil the fixture so the win is awarded to Metro
Points: Metro 22, Sussex -5

 

Saturday 8th June

London Metro v Yorkshire Vikings
Metro: 362/3, J Hollingsworth 177*, N Ebbeck 87, L Bradley 2-55
Yorkshire: 27 All Out, M Ghalib 4-6
London Metro won by 335 runs

 

Saturday 22nd June

Yorkshire Vikings v London Metro
Metro: 255/3 declared, M Dean 172, N Ebbeck 42, C Ashburn 2-36
Yorkshire: 43 All Out, R Wilcock 23, G Jones 4-2, A Law 2-16
London Metro won by 212 runs
Points: Metro 22, Yorkshire 1

 

Saturday 29th June

London Metro v Lancashire Lions
Lancashire: 31 All Out, M Ghalib 4-1, A Amin 3-10
Metro: 35/3, S Chohan 2-17
London Metro won by 7 wickets
Points: Metro 20, Lancashire 1

 

Saturday 6th July

London Metro v Sussex Sharks
Metro: 278/4 (30 overs), M Dean 113, J Hollingsworth 92, A Towers 2-44
Sussex: 264 All Out (28.4 overs), D Field 181, J Hollingsworth 3-37
London Metro won by 14 runs

 

Saturday 20th July

Somerset VICC v London Metro
Metro: 84 All Out (15.4 overs), M Dean 23, R Hossell 2-8, E Hossell 2-11
Somerset: 85/6 (19.1 overs), R Crisp 27, M Ghalib 4-7
Somerset VICC won by 4 wickets
Points: Somerset 20, Metro 3

 

Saturday 27th July

Surrey VICC v London Metro
Match Drawn, the game was rained off & could not be rearranged
Points: Surrey 8, Metro 8

 

Saturday 3rd August

BCEW David Townley Memorial Twenty20 Cup
Quarter Finals
London Metro v Lancashire Lions
Metro: 302/3, J Hollingsworth 154*, M Bond 84, A Sabir 2-26
Lancashire: 88 All Out, A Sabir 52, J Hollingsworth 3-1
London Metro won by 214 runs

 

Saturday 17th August

Kent Spitfires v London Metro
Match Abandoned Due To Rain
Points: Kent 8, Metro 8

 

BBS Primary Club Heindrich Swanepoel Memorial Cup

Saturday 31st August
Final, at The Brightside County Ground, Bristol
Somerset VICC v London Metro
Metro: 233/5 (30 overs), J Hollingsworth 89, M Dean 73
Somerset: 144/7 (30 overs), E Hossell 63, S Cook 34, A Law 2-3
London Metro won by 89 runs

 

BCEW David Townley Memorial Twenty20 Cup Finals Day

Saturday 21st September
Semi Finals
Yorkshire Vikings v London Metro
Yorkshire: 131/6, G Ferguson 45, R Aldred 26, R Field 2-18, G Jones 2-19
Metro: 134/2, M Dean 56, N Ebbeck 24
London Metro won by 8 wickets

 

Final

London Metro v Sussex Sharks
Metro: 260/1, M Dean 156*, A Law 42*
Sussex: 261/5 (19.2 overs), D Field 220*
Sussex Sharks won by 5 wickets

 

Metro Devils Cricket Season Results

BCEW Southern Regional League

 

Saturday 4th May
Metro Devils v Gloucestershire Growlers

Gloucestershire: 150 All Out (26.4 overs), D Hopkins 62*, J Kirkby 3-21
Metro Devils: 127/0 (13.2 overs), R Jones 51*, P Sellathurai 31*
Match Drawn (Metro Devils earn 4 extra points for winning draw)
** The match was ended early due to a thunderstorm
Points: Metro Devils 14, Gloucestershire 7

 

Saturday 25th May

Metro Devils v Hampshire VICC

Hampshire were unable to fulfil the fixture so the win is awarded to Metro Devils
Points: Metro Devils 22, Hampshire -5

 

Sunday 2nd June

Surrey VICC v Metro Devils

Metro Devils: 235/1 declared (25 overs), R Jones 51*, H Khan 36*, D Samuels 36*, E Amos 35, M Parsons 1-13
Surrey: 140/7 (27 overs), A Fowler 50*, D Samuels 3-9
Match Drawn (Metro Devils earn 4 extra points for winning draw)
Points: Metro Devils 15, Surrey 6

 

Saturday 22nd June

BCEW Southern Regional Twenty20 Cup

Quarter Final
Metro Devils v Dorset Dolphins
Dorset: 154/2, T Mackenzie 51*, B Williams 35*
Metro Devils: 153/7, R Jones 29, S Bailey 2-17
Dorset Dolphins won by 1 run

 

Sunday 28th July

Dorset Dolphins v Metro Devils
Dorset: 173/9 (28 overs), A Mabey 49, R Mackenzie 3-19
Metro Devils: 123/7 (24 overs), C Lewis 22*, R Burt 3-12
Match Drawn (Dorset earn 4 extra points for winning draw)
Points: Dorset 14, Metro Devils 10

 

Sunday 18th August

Berkshire Stags v Metro DevilsMetro Devils: 212/5 declared (24 overs), P Sellathurai 51*, J Kirkby 50*
Berkshire: 213/8 (24.3 overs), S Hoskin 50*, C Wallace 50*, M Ahmed 38, C Lewis 3-37
Berkshire Stags won by 2 wickets
Points: Berkshire 18, Metro Devils 8

 

These results obtained from the  www.bcew.co.uk website

Metro Cricket 2019 Results

Metro Cricket Team Win Heindrich Swanepoel Memorial Cup 2019!

Metro Team Cricket Season Results

these results obtained from the  www.bcew.co.uk website

 

BCEW National League

 

Saturday 18th May

London Metro v Northants Steelbacks
Metro: 261/9 declared (30 overs), M Dean 74, R Field 52,
M Turnham 4-83, C Ross 2-19
Northants: 42/2 (7.4 overs), S Miah 31*, G Jones 2-10
Match Drawn after play was abandoned due to rain
Points: Metro 10, Northants 10

 

Saturday 1st June

London Metro v Sussex Sharks
Sussex were unable to fulfil the fixture so the win is awarded to Metro
Points: Metro 22, Sussex -5

 

Saturday 8th June

London Metro v Yorkshire Vikings
Metro: 362/3, J Hollingsworth 177*, N Ebbeck 87, L Bradley 2-55
Yorkshire: 27 All Out, M Ghalib 4-6
London Metro won by 335 runs

 

Saturday 22nd June

Yorkshire Vikings v London Metro
Metro: 255/3 declared, M Dean 172, N Ebbeck 42, C Ashburn 2-36
Yorkshire: 43 All Out, R Wilcock 23, G Jones 4-2, A Law 2-16
London Metro won by 212 runs
Points: Metro 22, Yorkshire 1

 

Saturday 29th June

London Metro v Lancashire Lions
Lancashire: 31 All Out, M Ghalib 4-1, A Amin 3-10
Metro: 35/3, S Chohan 2-17
London Metro won by 7 wickets
Points: Metro 20, Lancashire 1

 

Saturday 6th July

London Metro v Sussex Sharks
Metro: 278/4 (30 overs), M Dean 113, J Hollingsworth 92, A Towers 2-44
Sussex: 264 All Out (28.4 overs), D Field 181, J Hollingsworth 3-37
London Metro won by 14 runs

 

Saturday 20th July

Somerset VICC v London Metro
Metro: 84 All Out (15.4 overs), M Dean 23, R Hossell 2-8, E Hossell 2-11
Somerset: 85/6 (19.1 overs), R Crisp 27, M Ghalib 4-7
Somerset VICC won by 4 wickets
Points: Somerset 20, Metro 3

 

Saturday 27th July

Surrey VICC v London Metro
Match Drawn, the game was rained off & could not be rearranged
Points: Surrey 8, Metro 8

 

Saturday 3rd August

BCEW David Townley Memorial Twenty20 Cup
Quarter Finals
London Metro v Lancashire Lions
Metro: 302/3, J Hollingsworth 154*, M Bond 84, A Sabir 2-26
Lancashire: 88 All Out, A Sabir 52, J Hollingsworth 3-1
London Metro won by 214 runs

 

Saturday 17th August

Kent Spitfires v London Metro
Match Abandoned Due To Rain
Points: Kent 8, Metro 8

 

BBS Primary Club Heindrich Swanepoel Memorial Cup

Saturday 31st August
Final, at The Brightside County Ground, Bristol
Somerset VICC v London Metro
Metro: 233/5 (30 overs), J Hollingsworth 89, M Dean 73
Somerset: 144/7 (30 overs), E Hossell 63, S Cook 34, A Law 2-3
London Metro won by 89 runs

 

BCEW David Townley Memorial Twenty20 Cup Finals Day

Saturday 21st September
Semi Finals
Yorkshire Vikings v London Metro
Yorkshire: 131/6, G Ferguson 45, R Aldred 26, R Field 2-18, G Jones 2-19
Metro: 134/2, M Dean 56, N Ebbeck 24
London Metro won by 8 wickets

 

Final

London Metro v Sussex Sharks
Metro: 260/1, M Dean 156*, A Law 42*
Sussex: 261/5 (19.2 overs), D Field 220*
Sussex Sharks won by 5 wickets

 

Metro Devils Cricket Season Results

BCEW Southern Regional League

 

Saturday 4th May
Metro Devils v Gloucestershire Growlers

Gloucestershire: 150 All Out (26.4 overs), D Hopkins 62*, J Kirkby 3-21
Metro Devils: 127/0 (13.2 overs), R Jones 51*, P Sellathurai 31*
Match Drawn (Metro Devils earn 4 extra points for winning draw)
** The match was ended early due to a thunderstorm
Points: Metro Devils 14, Gloucestershire 7

 

Saturday 25th May

Metro Devils v Hampshire VICC

Hampshire were unable to fulfil the fixture so the win is awarded to Metro Devils
Points: Metro Devils 22, Hampshire -5

 

Sunday 2nd June

Surrey VICC v Metro Devils

Metro Devils: 235/1 declared (25 overs), R Jones 51*, H Khan 36*, D Samuels 36*, E Amos 35, M Parsons 1-13
Surrey: 140/7 (27 overs), A Fowler 50*, D Samuels 3-9
Match Drawn (Metro Devils earn 4 extra points for winning draw)
Points: Metro Devils 15, Surrey 6

 

Saturday 22nd June

BCEW Southern Regional Twenty20 Cup

Quarter Final
Metro Devils v Dorset Dolphins
Dorset: 154/2, T Mackenzie 51*, B Williams 35*
Metro Devils: 153/7, R Jones 29, S Bailey 2-17
Dorset Dolphins won by 1 run

 

Sunday 28th July

Dorset Dolphins v Metro Devils
Dorset: 173/9 (28 overs), A Mabey 49, R Mackenzie 3-19
Metro Devils: 123/7 (24 overs), C Lewis 22*, R Burt 3-12
Match Drawn (Dorset earn 4 extra points for winning draw)
Points: Dorset 14, Metro Devils 10

 

Sunday 18th August

Berkshire Stags v Metro DevilsMetro Devils: 212/5 declared (24 overs), P Sellathurai 51*, J Kirkby 50*
Berkshire: 213/8 (24.3 overs), S Hoskin 50*, C Wallace 50*, M Ahmed 38, C Lewis 3-37
Berkshire Stags won by 2 wickets
Points: Berkshire 18, Metro Devils 8

 

These results obtained from the  www.bcew.co.uk website

 

Cricket: It’s a Washout! 

Metro Devils vs Gloucestershire Growlers 

It’s a Washout! 

Metro Devils vs Gloucestershire Growlers 

5th May 2019

A washout that was not just rain but hail too at about six-fifteen; the fourth time that rain had interfered with the Devils match against the Gloucestershire Growlers bringing it to an end. The home side was very disappointed as this meant their fantastic performance could not end as a win, with just 24 runs required and plenty of overs to spare. This was however not quite the washout of the week before when Metro had not been able to start their defence of the National League title in Yorkshire as the game was called off on Friday evening. A rearrangement is hoped for.

Wicket, bat and ball with the cricket match in the background
Wicket, bat and ball with the cricket match in the background – photo by Charlie Raven

So to return to this Saturday where the match between two well-matched teams began with the home skipper, Hassan, hardly able to get out quickly enough a decision to field first after winning the toss. The home side had two debutants Prem Sellathurai and Mujahaid Zabit while the visitors included one very familiar face in their team – Aemonn having joined the Growlers over the winter. A winter that was still present as a shower delayed the start until almost one thirty.

Metro Devils Cricket Team
Metro Devils Cricket Team

Once able to start the Devils made the early running with the skipper taking a diving catch at short cover in Jack’s first over, this wicket being followed just two overs later by that of the away skipper bowled to leave the visitors on 17 for 2 at the first bowling change. A couple of overs later after two batsmen had been clean bowled Aemonn was facing Asif’s hat trick ball; which he was able to block. A few overs later he did not block but skied the ball straight up, surely aware of the risk giving who was bowling, as Ryan was able to run down the pitch and take a brilliant diving catch, perhaps an early contender for “catch of the season”; with just 60 runs on the board.

The next wicket to fall also involved Ryan who gathered a wild return from Hassan to complete a run out just one ball before thunder and lightning brought a ten-minute break in play that reduced the game to 50 overs. The next few overs were the best for the visitors as their opener, Dan, reached 50 before having to retire; and the Devils then regained the upper hand as Jack took his third wicket. This left the visitors desperately running hard to grab as many runs as possible. Rob and Dave Samuels both picked up wickets and then, Ryan having moved off the boundary to short cover, secured a run out as one risk too many was taken – leaving Dan on 62 and a target of 151 to win from 23 overs.

With rain still threatening and the temperature distinctly chilly tea was hurried as sitting outside was unpleasant and the devils were very keen to start their run chase. Metro openers Prem and Ryan raced, at times literally – as Ryan could certainly run three while Prem ran two and was not far short of running two while Prem ran one, to 76 from eight overs before another twenty-minute rain break before the umpires were satisfied that the ground was dry enough to play safely again. Ryan reached his 50 with a drive through cover for two off a no-ball with 83 on the board just one over later. Hassan joined Prem before being forced off injured to be replaced by Ahmed as the continued chill had forced Mujahaid, among others, to change from his kit into warmer clothes leaving a limited choice of substitutes. The Growlers were still unable to slow the scoring rate which remained at about ten an over until the final storm came leaving Prem on 31 scored at a run a ball.

The next cricket at Highgate sees Northants playing Metro on the 18th, while in other news the delayed 2018 T20 cup finals saw Somerset emerge as winners by beating Yorkshire and Northants on another chilly, but at least dry, day in Wolverhampton.

Report By Paul Toplis

 

 

Love of the beautiful game!

Love for the beautiful game by Hassan Khan

Hear from Hassan Khan on his love for the beautiful game of cricket!

“Cricket has been the vehicle to greater things in my life”

original post by activityalliance.org.uk

Hello, I’m Hassan, a proud southwest Londoner. I’m 32 years-old and I’m registered blind. I’m a former England VI cricketer, currently playing cricket for Metro Blind Sport’s two cricket teams, Metro and the Metro Devils – which I captain.

My love for cricket started to grow from an early age. I grew up in Pakistan in a village of 200-300 people, where the game of cricket was adored by all. I used to play in living rooms, dusty streets, grounds and slums across the country. It was a game for the rich and the poor but sadly, not if you were blind.

I lost my sight at the age of three but I would carry a bat around following my dad. He allowed his friends to bowl to me and they would call me little Imran Khan. The cards I was dealt with in my early life meant, education, cricket or any sort of an active lifestyle was utterly inaccessible. Alas, the love of my life and I quickly parted, perhaps even at that age, I realised cricket was not written in my script.

However, at the age of 17 I got hold of that long forgotten script, read it, ripped a few of the pages and started a chapter of my own.

My PE teacher introduced me to the game I once loved, but now accessible for me, I quickly learned I still maintained some of my skills and I fell head over heels in love with cricket again. I found myself training with Metro Blind Sport, a London-based charity which aims to open doors to sport for all visually impaired people, no matter their age or ability. Their standard of blind cricket was just breath-taking. I didn’t think I’d ever pull on a Metro shirt in a competitive match but I did.

I didn’t just discover cricket at Metro Blind Sport, I discovered independence, freedom and a new lease of life. Cricket became the vehicle to greater things in life, such as university, volunteering, employment, living on my own and the greatest achievement of all, representing my country.

The highlight of my cricketing career has to be winning The Ashes on Australia day! This was the sweetest day of my life.

The active lifestyle I now lead allows me to be fit mentally and physically – sometimes I find it beneficial to stay away from my thoughts, and playing and training allows me to achieve this. It also allows me to enjoy camaraderie and build relationships. I really enjoy competition and so playing cricket internationally or nationally allows me to compete for trophies and personal awards which I relish.

Being active also keeps me balanced and motivated which really helps in my daily life. Some of the skills I practise on the field I’m then able to take into work, one good example of this is leadership.

Cricket takes me through a variety of emotions. When I’m preparing for a match, initially I feel quite proud. During the game I do put a lot of pressure on myself and I feel quite tense and lost in the moment. After a game my physical and mental wellbeing purely depends on the final result of the game. If it’s a loss I do feel terrible, I ache and I go into reflect mode. Naturally, winning makes me feel great – I love celebrating a victory with my teammates.

The support of my teammates has been really important to me. I rely heavily on them for support on and off the field, particularly advice and support from the senior players, such as Andy Dalby-Welsh, Deputy CEO at Activity Alliance. He has played a major role in my development and aided me in settling into the England VI team in the 2006 World Cup.

Thanks to that support network and friendship I now have the confidence to offer support to other players. For me, cricket is a family sport, so family, friends and teammates are crucial, particularly on away tours when you are stuck in hotels for weeks and you need that support element.

My advice to other disabled people who are thinking about being more active but not sure how is – reach out to charities who will do everything in their power to support you, or sign post you to organisations that can assist with our goals. If you should choose to try something active today, you are more than likely to make new friends, improve the quality of your life and discover the inner you, which is empowering to say the least. Worst case scenario, you may decide it isn’t for you, but at least you know within yourself you tried something new, something out of the ordinary.

Unlike me, you may not appreciate competitive sports and that’s absolutely fine. There are development leagues in cricket and Metro Blind Sport actually deliver different visually impaired friendly sporting activities in London.

by Hassan Khan

 

Love of the beautiful game!

Love for the beautiful game by Hassan Khan

Hear from Hassan Khan on his love for the beautiful game of cricket!

“Cricket has been the vehicle to greater things in my life”

original post by activityalliance.org.uk

Hello, I’m Hassan, a proud southwest Londoner. I’m 32 years-old and I’m registered blind. I’m a former England VI cricketer, currently playing cricket for Metro Blind Sport’s two cricket teams, Metro and the Metro Devils – which I captain.

My love for cricket started to grow from an early age. I grew up in Pakistan in a village of 200-300 people, where the game of cricket was adored by all. I used to play in living rooms, dusty streets, grounds and slums across the country. It was a game for the rich and the poor but sadly, not if you were blind.

I lost my sight at the age of three but I would carry a bat around following my dad. He allowed his friends to bowl to me and they would call me little Imran Khan. The cards I was dealt with in my early life meant, education, cricket or any sort of an active lifestyle was utterly inaccessible. Alas, the love of my life and I quickly parted, perhaps even at that age, I realised cricket was not written in my script.

However, at the age of 17 I got hold of that long forgotten script, read it, ripped a few of the pages and started a chapter of my own.

My PE teacher introduced me to the game I once loved, but now accessible for me, I quickly learned I still maintained some of my skills and I fell head over heels in love with cricket again. I found myself training with Metro Blind Sport, a London-based charity which aims to open doors to sport for all visually impaired people, no matter their age or ability. Their standard of blind cricket was just breath-taking. I didn’t think I’d ever pull on a Metro shirt in a competitive match but I did.

I didn’t just discover cricket at Metro Blind Sport, I discovered independence, freedom and a new lease of life. Cricket became the vehicle to greater things in life, such as university, volunteering, employment, living on my own and the greatest achievement of all, representing my country.

The highlight of my cricketing career has to be winning The Ashes on Australia day! This was the sweetest day of my life.

The active lifestyle I now lead allows me to be fit mentally and physically – sometimes I find it beneficial to stay away from my thoughts, and playing and training allows me to achieve this. It also allows me to enjoy camaraderie and build relationships. I really enjoy competition and so playing cricket internationally or nationally allows me to compete for trophies and personal awards which I relish.

Being active also keeps me balanced and motivated which really helps in my daily life. Some of the skills I practise on the field I’m then able to take into work, one good example of this is leadership.

Cricket takes me through a variety of emotions. When I’m preparing for a match, initially I feel quite proud. During the game I do put a lot of pressure on myself and I feel quite tense and lost in the moment. After a game my physical and mental wellbeing purely depends on the final result of the game. If it’s a loss I do feel terrible, I ache and I go into reflect mode. Naturally, winning makes me feel great – I love celebrating a victory with my teammates.

The support of my teammates has been really important to me. I rely heavily on them for support on and off the field, particularly advice and support from the senior players, such as Andy Dalby-Welsh, Deputy CEO at Activity Alliance. He has played a major role in my development and aided me in settling into the England VI team in the 2006 World Cup.

Thanks to that support network and friendship I now have the confidence to offer support to other players. For me, cricket is a family sport, so family, friends and teammates are crucial, particularly on away tours when you are stuck in hotels for weeks and you need that support element.

My advice to other disabled people who are thinking about being more active but not sure how is – reach out to charities who will do everything in their power to support you, or sign post you to organisations that can assist with our goals. If you should choose to try something active today, you are more than likely to make new friends, improve the quality of your life and discover the inner you, which is empowering to say the least. Worst case scenario, you may decide it isn’t for you, but at least you know within yourself you tried something new, something out of the ordinary.

Unlike me, you may not appreciate competitive sports and that’s absolutely fine. There are development leagues in cricket and Metro Blind Sport actually deliver different visually impaired friendly sporting activities in London.

by Hassan Khan