Tag Archives: RNIB

RNIB: Top Tips Easing of lockdown!

RNIB: Top Tips Easing of lockdown!

RNIB: Top Tips Easing of lockdown:  Advice for people with sight loss

Here are just a few tips to help you feel confident in adjusting to the ‘new normal’.

Be prepared

Before returning to your favourite shopping centre or restaurant, why not check out what changes they’ve made so you have some idea of what to expect? You can either find this information online, or just give them a call.

Equip yourself

Try and equip yourself with anything that will make your outing easier. For instance, if you’re concerned about finding hand sanitiser as you enter shops, why not take your own bottle? And if you’re not usually a cane or guide dog user but would like people to be aware that you might struggle to see them, consider getting a symbol cane or other visual indicator.

Be aware of changes to the environment

From store layouts and queueing systems to streets and public transport, there have been significant changes to our environments. All of this is to help us stay safe, but it’s important that you bear in mind that places you’re usually familiar with might be very different.

Give yourself time

Due to the changes in our environments, it’s important to give yourself plenty of time to get used to the new surroundings and protocols. You may even feel more comfortable if you plan to go out with someone else for your first few outings.

Don’t be afraid to ask for assistance

Whether it’s finding hand sanitiser or completing a track and trace form, we’re all having to get used to the ‘new normal’, so don’t be afraid to ask for assistance.

Stay safe and stay comfortable

Government guidance now includes wearing a face mask in shops, as well as public transport, and some people are worried it might obscure their visual field or glasses. Why not try a few different masks in the safety of your home to find one that best suits you.

 

What is life like for you? – Study by RNIB, Guide Dogs & TPT

What is life like for you a Study by RNIB, Guide Dogs & TPT

Take part in a vital study into the lives of blind and partially sighted people

Take part in a vital study into the lives of blind and partially sighted people
For the first time ever RNIB, Guide Dogs and Thomas Pocklington Trust are jointly carrying out an important piece of research to uncover the realities of life for blind and partially sighted people in the UK today.

We need to hear what you think! What is life like for you. How can we do better?

This research will be used to help us deliver better services and work jointly to make a positive difference to the lives of blind and partially sighted people.

The final results from the survey will be shared across the whole sector to improve services and support for people with vision impairment.

The research is carried out via a telephone interview by our research partner DJS research and Acumen which may last up to 50 minutes. Participation is entirely voluntary and you can withdraw from the study at any point. All data is anonymised so you cannot subsequently be identified. The only time this anonymity may be reviewed is if there were serious concerns about yours or someone else’s safety.

If you are blind or partially sighted, we would like to hear from you.

Tell us about your life and what’s most important to you!

 

 

Return to Play: Sports and Leisure Sector Guidance

RNIB BBS & Metro Blind Sport's Best Practice Leisure Guidelines

RNIB, British Blind Sport, Metro Blind Sport and Visionary issue guidance for leisure operators to support the return of blind and partially sighted people

In preparation for the reopening of leisure and sport facilities, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), British Blind Sport (BBS), Metro Blind Sport and Visionary have been working together to provide practical guidance to support the return of blind and partially sighted people to physical activity.

Research conducted by RNIB has found that two thirds (66 per cent) of blind and partially sighted people feel less independent now compared to before lockdown, demonstrating that social distancing measures, as brought in to tackle the Covid-19 pandemic, are incredibly difficult for many people living with sight loss. In addition, inaccessible signage and fear about how the public will react to them if they are unable to follow the guidelines is causing increased stress and worry.

In response to these anxieties, RNIB, BBS, Metro and Visionary have created practical guidance which will help leisure operators and sport providers prepare for welcoming people back to physical activity, with the least amount of stress and difficulty. The guidance provides simple considerations that will make the return more straightforward and encourages the wider public to be mindful that sight loss may not always be obvious. The guidance demonstrates how to communicate clearly any changes to the facilities, particularly floor indicators or arrows, protective screens and temporary barriers.

Marc Powell, Strategic Accessibility Lead at RNIB, said: “The findings from RNIB’s survey clearly show how much of a significant impact social distancing measures are having on the lives of blind and partially sighted people. As lockdown restrictions ease, we’ve increasingly heard from people with sight loss who are incredibly anxious about how to manage the situation. By creating clear, implementable guidance for leisure operators, we hope that some pressure and stress will be relieved for blind and partially sighted people, and that we will make the general public more aware of the challenges being faced by our community during this time.”

Alaina MacGregor, Chief Executive at BBS, said “During the pandemic, blind and partially sighted people have been facing specific and unique challenges that have had an enormous impact on everyday independence. We have been interested to learn about the issues that people with sight loss have faced due to social distancing particularly visual cues in public places. To ensure that these issues are not repeated in the sporting environment, together we have created clear and easy to follow guidance that can be put into place for safe return to play. This guidance will make a huge difference to people who want to return to living independent lives and will offer additional assistance to the organisations who provide inclusive physical activity opportunities.”

Martin Symcox, Chief Executive at Metro Blind Sport, said: “People with sight loss have faced significant difficulties in observing social distancing since lockdown has been in place and again since it has been relaxed. Many individuals have told us that they are worried about returning to physical activity without any clear guidance in place and are unsure of the new barriers that they may face. We hope that we have made it simple and cost effective for our suggested measures to be implemented before facilities reopen and that this will give blind and partially sighted people the confidence and reassurance they need to return to the activities that they enjoy.”

all Metro Blind Sport work is  kindly supported by Thomas Pocklington Trust
TPT Logo

Please click here to read the new Sport and Leisure Sector Guidance

For more information on this guidance, please contact Marc Powell on marc.powell@rnib.org.uk

 

Return to Play: Sports and Leisure Sector Guidance

RNIB BBS & Metro Blind Sport's Best Practice Leisure Guidelines

RNIB, British Blind Sport, Metro Blind Sport and Visionary issue guidance for leisure operators to support the return of blind and partially sighted people

In preparation for the reopening of leisure and sport facilities, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), British Blind Sport (BBS), Metro Blind Sport and Visionary have been working together to provide practical guidance to support the return of blind and partially sighted people to physical activity.

Research conducted by RNIB has found that two thirds (66 per cent) of blind and partially sighted people feel less independent now compared to before lockdown, demonstrating that social distancing measures, as brought in to tackle the Covid-19 pandemic, are incredibly difficult for many people living with sight loss. In addition, inaccessible signage and fear about how the public will react to them if they are unable to follow the guidelines is causing increased stress and worry.

In response to these anxieties, RNIB, BBS, Metro and Visionary have created practical guidance which will help leisure operators and sport providers prepare for welcoming people back to physical activity, with the least amount of stress and difficulty. The guidance provides simple considerations that will make the return more straightforward and encourages the wider public to be mindful that sight loss may not always be obvious. The guidance demonstrates how to communicate clearly any changes to the facilities, particularly floor indicators or arrows, protective screens and temporary barriers.

Marc Powell, Strategic Accessibility Lead at RNIB, said: “The findings from RNIB’s survey clearly show how much of a significant impact social distancing measures are having on the lives of blind and partially sighted people. As lockdown restrictions ease, we’ve increasingly heard from people with sight loss who are incredibly anxious about how to manage the situation. By creating clear, implementable guidance for leisure operators, we hope that some pressure and stress will be relieved for blind and partially sighted people, and that we will make the general public more aware of the challenges being faced by our community during this time.”

Alaina MacGregor, Chief Executive at BBS, said “During the pandemic, blind and partially sighted people have been facing specific and unique challenges that have had an enormous impact on everyday independence. We have been interested to learn about the issues that people with sight loss have faced due to social distancing particularly visual cues in public places. To ensure that these issues are not repeated in the sporting environment, together we have created clear and easy to follow guidance that can be put into place for safe return to play. This guidance will make a huge difference to people who want to return to living independent lives and will offer additional assistance to the organisations who provide inclusive physical activity opportunities.”

Martin Symcox, Chief Executive at Metro Blind Sport, said: “People with sight loss have faced significant difficulties in observing social distancing since lockdown has been in place and again since it has been relaxed. Many individuals have told us that they are worried about returning to physical activity without any clear guidance in place and are unsure of the new barriers that they may face. We hope that we have made it simple and cost effective for our suggested measures to be implemented before facilities reopen and that this will give blind and partially sighted people the confidence and reassurance they need to return to the activities that they enjoy.”

Please click here to read the new Sport and Leisure Sector Guidance

For more information on this guidance, please contact Marc Powell on marc.powell@rnib.org.uk

 

 

RNIB: Talk and Support service!

RNIB: Talk and Support service! Call Helpline: 0303 123 9999

Talk and support service

RNIB understands that it can be lonely and isolating for some people living with a visual impairment. Through our national Talk & Support service we connect people together for regular, friendly conversation and peer support.

Our service is free and we offer a variety of options for people to connect with others both over the phone and online.

We urge anyone in our community who needs us to call our Helpline on 0303 123 9999 or email helpline@rnib.org.uk.

You can join a group of people with similar shared interests on a weekly basis via a voice call.  Our groups enable people to come together to meet new people, socialise and share tips in a safe space.

The groups run weekly on the same day and time, for 55 minutes for a period of 6-12 weeks with a trained facilitator present during the call.

In the last session, our facilitator will discuss with the group how you can remain connected if people are keen to do so. The idea being that friendships can continue after the 6-12 weeks.

During these challenging times, information is vital. In response, we are ramping up our support and services to ensure blind and partially sighted people get the help they need.

Call our Helpline on 0303 123 9999 or email helpline@rnib.org.uk.

Help us continue removing barriers that stop people with sight loss from living the lives they want to lead – visit https://www.rnib.org.uk to donate today.