Tag Archives: London Vision

Sight Loss: What You Need to Know – Zoom sessions

Sight Loss: What You Need to Know- Zoom sessions with London Vision

Sight Loss: What You Need to Know virtual /phone sessions

The London Vision team will be hosting Sight Loss: What You Need to Know sessions over the coming months. The sessions will take place on the digital meeting platform Zoom, but they will be accessible for people with computers and smartphones and for people who only have access to a landline phone.

Each session will be themed; we will cover different areas including reasons for registering as a blind partially sighted person and the benefits associated with registration; tips and tricks for living with sight loss; getting out and about; introduction to technology, and sport and leisure.

The sessions will be informal and there will be plenty of opportunities to ask questions and share your ideas. We will also keep the groups small to allow for conversations. Your friends or family are also welcome to join in with these sessions and discussions.

If you are interested in joining, please call Chris on 020 3761 3651 or get in touch via e-mail info@londonvision.org

Please don’t hesitate to get in touch with questions, and feel free to share this message with anyone you think might benefit from the course.

 

Upcoming sessions

  • 21 July 11 am – 12 pm              Getting out and about
  • 21 July 2.30 pm – 3.30 pm        Getting out and about
  • 22 July 6 pm – 7 pm                   Getting out and about
  • 28 July 11 am – 12 pm               Everyday Life Skills
  • 28 July 2.30 pm – 3.30 pm        Everyday Life Skills
  • 28 July 6 pm – 7 pm                   Everyday Life Skills
  • 4 August 11 am – 12 pm            Sport and Leisure
  • 4 August 2.30 pm – 3.30 pm     Sport and Leisure
  • 4 August 2.30 pm – 3.30 pm     Introduction to Technology
  • 5 August 6 pm – 7 pm               Sport and Leisure
  • 6 August 11 am – 12 pm           Introduction to Technology
  • 6 August 2.30 pm – 3.30 pm     Introduction to Technology
  • 11 August 6 pm – 7 pm             How to feel good about yourself
  • 13 August 11 am – 12 pm         How to feel good about yourself
  • 13 August 2.30pm – 3.30 pm   How to feel good about yourself
  • 18 August 11 am – 12 pm         Setting goals and targets
  • 19 August 2.30 pm – 3.30pm   Setting goals and targets
  • 19 August 6 pm – 7 pm             Setting goals and targets
  • 9 Sept  2.30pm – 3.30pm        Registration and rights
  • 10 Sept 11 am – 12 pm            Registration and rights
  • 10 Sept 2.3 0pm – 3.3 0pm       Registration and rights
  • 15 Sept 11 am – 12 pm             Getting out and about
  • 15 Sept 2.30 pm – 3.30 pm       Getting out and about
  • 16 Sept 6 pm – 7 pm                 Getting out and about

 

Important

When you join a session your phone call should be free but please check with your provider first.

London Vision Info

info@londonvision.org

www.londonvision.org

 

Travel Advice from London Vision

Travel Advice from London Vision

Travel Advice from London Vision

Please be aware that this travel advice has been collated from several sources, including Transport for London and National Rail. This advice was accurate at the time of writing
(1 July 2020) but could change at any time.

If you find yourself in a situation needing public transport to travel, then please follow government guidelines. Many people with a vision impairment rely upon assistance by train staff, station staff, verbal assistance from bus drivers or even members of the public, which on occasions, can be physical assistance as well.

With the type of support available and guidance and information being updated regularly, here are a few points on what you need to bear in mind when travelling on public transport:

1)   Ensure that your journey is essential and only travel if you have no other choice. Have you considered alternative forms of transport? For example: taxi, minicab, using the taxi card scheme, asking a friend or family member or perhaps checking eligibility for hospital transport?  However, if you do need to travel, please try to travel during off peak periods.

2)   For many blind and partially sighted people, public transport is the only option. Please wear a face mask/covering if you can. If you cannot, then you can visit the Transport for London website and print out a badge which best describes your circumstances. This is for you to carry in case you are stopped. Simply show this badge without getting into a confrontation. You can access the badges by clicking here. You can print out the badge and display it on a lanyard or download it on to your smartphone to display when asked. If you don’t have a smartphone or printer you can contact TfL on 0343 222 1234 or via the Contact Us page and they will print one and send it out to you.

3)   Plan your journey. Most services are now running, but they could be limited during times, or perhaps a shorter service; so here are some links you can use to plan your journey below:

  1. Journey Planner
  2. Nearest Bus app – available from Apple App Store or Android Google Play
  3. Phone number – 0343 222 1234

4)   If you are not normally an active cane user or a Guide Dog owner, carrying a symbol cane or using your long cane in these circumstances would really benefit you. Other people will then be aware of you and, therefore, support you in giving you space and help maintain social distancing. Staff will be more aware of you and not just on the transport network, but also in supermarkets etc. Please contact your local Rehab Officer who is based at the Sensory Team within your Local Authority, in the first instance, or the RNIB, if you would like further information on where to obtain and receive training on using a white cane.

5)   Buses – if you need to travel by bus, the bus drivers are now behind a protective screen. They can support with verbal directions or information such as what the bus number is, or where the scanner to scan your pass is if you are struggling to locate it. They can advise on where the empty seats are to help ensure social distancing can be maintained. Please also bear in mind that the bus driver has the right to ask you to wait for the next bus if the bus has reached its maximum capacity. Buses are now operating using the front doors.

6)   Train/Tube – If you need to travel by tube or train, please bear in mind that there will be a queuing system to enter the station but as a blind or partially sighted passenger, you are exempt from this rule. You can approach the front of the station without having to explain, on the basis you have a visible mobility aid.

You may be asked if you would like assistance or feel free to request it. If you are travelling with a sighted companion, this also applies to you both. You do not have to queue and you both will be let in and your companion can continue guiding you along the journey. The support being offered is that staff in first instance will provide sighted guiding assistance, they too will be wearing masks unless they are exempt and will be wearing protective gear.

If you are happy to be guided with verbal directions, then please do let the member of staff know and you can follow them instead. If you do need to go into a lift, they will press the button and wait for the doors to close, they will then use the stairs or escalators to meet you outside the lift doors again. If for any reason the staff feel that it is not safe to sight guide, then the offer of taxi will be available to your chosen end station.

7)   Please do bear in mind that many station layouts have changed since the pandemic so please do ask for assistance even if you don’t usually. They can support with assisting you, maintain social distancing, booking, Turn Up & Go assistance ahead of your journey on that particular train, so that at the other end, a member of staff will be there to meet you.

8)   If you are travelling by National Rail, then please check timetables and book assistance in advance. Please check your travel plans getting to the station and at the other end too. If you are a Guide Dog user, please let them know in advance, so that they can allocate adequate seating.

9)   If you need to travel by taxi or mini cab, please wear a face mask if you can, keep the windows open and check with the operator what guidelines they are adhering too.

  • Please follow government guidelines and travel only if it is absolutely necessary.
  • If you present symptoms of COVID-19, please do not travel.
  • Try travelling during off-peak times to prevent the network from getting too crowded.
  • Carry a bottle of water or snacks as well as wipes or hand sanitiser.
  • Please allow more time to travel than usual – buses and trains are operating at lower capacity which means you may have to wait to board trains or buses that are less crowded.

Please bear in mind that street layouts in some areas have also changed. Some pavements have been widened to help pedestrians and cyclists social distance, and often they take up part of what was the road.

This means that boarding a bus may now require walking down the kerb and into part of what was formerly the road. This may also mean that taxi ranks may have relocated too. Please also bear in mind that local shops may have queues outside, obstructing part of the pavement.

To check if your local streets have been affected, you can visit this link for more information.

 These are the latest guidelines we have put together from policies and procedures put together by Transport for London. We are still waiting for official guidelines with regards to up to date information on which streets have been affected and future plans.

Bhavini Makwana
Engagement Manager
bhavini.makwana@londonvision.org
07976 448824
www.londonvision.org

WAF Presents: Gerard McDermott!

Working Age Forum Presents: Gerard McDermott Actor 4 March!

Working Age Forum Presents Gerard McDermott Actor!

London Vision is delighted to present actor Gerard McDermott as the speaker at our March event. Gerard has worked as an actor in theatre, television and radio for 30 years.

Event details

Date: 4 March  Time: 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Venue: The Pocklington Hub, Tavistock House South Entrance D, Tavistock Square, London, WC1H 9LG
Reserve your place:  email: waf.london@londonvision.org
Contact: Liam O’Carroll on: 07970 231 583
His theatre work has taken him to many corners of the globe from Denmark to the USA and Iceland to Brazil. His many roles in television and radio have seen him join the venerated list of actors to have appeared in such institutions as Eastenders, the Archers and Downton Abbey. Some of his most recent appearances were in Vera and Casualty.

Come along and hear how Gerard’s visual impairment influences and is influenced by the different challenges of theatre, television and radio; find out what access technology continues to play a part in his work; discover what additional stratagems he has had to employ in this fiercely competitive and often discriminatory industry.

We can offer assistance from Euston and Euston Square stations for those who request it, to reserve your place for the event please email: waf.london@londonvision.org
Please RSVP no later than Wednesday 26 February.

If you have any issues on the evening, please contact Liam O’Carroll on:
07970 231 583

 

Assistive Technology Focus Group!

Assistive Technology Focus Group 5 March RSVP by Fri 28 Feb

Thomas Pocklington Trust and London Vision cordially invite you to share your experiences of assistive technologies and ideas for future innovation at a focus group which will be held at the Pocklington Hub in central London on Thursday 5 March.

The purpose of the focus group is to discuss some of the current barriers which blind and partially sighted people experience when travelling independently and when controlling their home environments.

We want to hear from you if:

  • You are blind or partially sighted.
  • You are happy to share your personal experiences of wearable and home-integrated assistive technologies.
  • You are interested in or have opinions on the role technology should play in designing more inclusive and independent futures for blind and partially sighted people.

Event Details

The focus group will take place on Date: Thursday 5th March from  Time: 12 pm – 2 pm

Location – The Pocklington Hub, 4th Floor, Entrance D Tavistock House South, Tavistock Square, London WC1H 9LG

Drinks and snacks will be provided, and participants will receive a £5 Amazon Gift Voucher. There are limited spaces available which will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

To RSVP, please email darren.paskell@pocklington-trust.org.uk before close of play on Friday 28 February.

At the focus group, some of the key topic areas we wish to cover include:

  • Current use of assistive technologies
  • Perception through audio vs. vibrotactile.
  • Interactive brainstorming session of future assistive technologies.
  • Testing and feedback of the first stage prototypes.

Sophie Horrocks is currently studying her MA and MSc in Global Innovation Design at the Royal College of Art and Imperial College London. She is a human-centred designer working on developing an assistive technology to improve independence and communication, both indoors and outdoors, for blind and partially sighted people using radar technology.

The personal experiences and ideas shared at this focus group will be used to inform the development of an assistive technology prototype – ensuring that the end product can create the biggest possible impact.

 

Assistive Technology Focus Group!

Assistive Technology Focus Group 5 March RSVP by Fri 28 Feb
Venue:
The Pocklington Hub, 4th Floor, Entrance D Tavistock House South, Tavistock Square, London WC1H 9LG
Time:
12.00 pm - 2.00 pm
Phone:
Date:
05th March 2020
Cost:
FREE - participants will receive a £5 Amazon Gift Voucher.


Thomas Pocklington Trust and London Vision cordially invite you to share your experiences of assistive technologies and ideas for future innovation at a focus group which will be held at the Pocklington Hub in central London on Thursday 5 March.

The purpose of the focus group is to discuss some of the current barriers which blind and partially sighted people experience when travelling independently and when controlling their home environments.

We want to hear from you if:

  • You are blind or partially sighted.
  • You are happy to share your personal experiences of wearable and home-integrated assistive technologies.
  • You are interested in or have opinions on the role technology should play in designing more inclusive and independent futures for blind and partially sighted people.

Event Details

The focus group will take place on Date: Thursday 5th March from  Time: 12 pm – 2 pm

Location – The Pocklington Hub, 4th Floor, Entrance D Tavistock House South, Tavistock Square, London WC1H 9LG

Drinks and snacks will be provided, and participants will receive a £5 Amazon Gift Voucher. There are limited spaces available which will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

To RSVP, please email darren.paskell@pocklington-trust.org.uk before close of play on Friday 28 February.

At the focus group, some of the key topic areas we wish to cover include:

  • Current use of assistive technologies
  • Perception through audio vs. vibrotactile.
  • Interactive brainstorming session of future assistive technologies.
  • Testing and feedback of the first stage prototypes.

Sophie Horrocks is currently studying her MA and MSc in Global Innovation Design at the Royal College of Art and Imperial College London. She is a human-centred designer working on developing an assistive technology to improve independence and communication, both indoors and outdoors, for blind and partially sighted people using radar technology.

The personal experiences and ideas shared at this focus group will be used to inform the development of an assistive technology prototype – ensuring that the end product can create the biggest possible impact.