Tag Archives: Cricket

Cricket: Welcome to Time Travel : Howzat!!

Cricket: Welcome to Time Travel : Howzat!!

Cricket: Welcome to Time Travel: Howzat!!

sharing our heritage from Bruce Castle Museum & Archive.

The game does tend to have a ‘marmite effect’ on people – you either love it or hate it. And the ever-changing aspects of the game can quickly cause schisms within the fans themselves. For some, it’s only the Test Matches that count. For others, the game’s ability to be transformed into a series of explosive big hits and run-outs, with one day matches or T20 games, is part of its beauty.

Watching cricket in the field by Mr Cole’s Potteries in White Hart Lane, Wood Green c.1888.
Watching cricket in the field by Mr Cole’s Potteries in White Hart Lane, Wood Green c.1888.
Fromthe collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

Haringey – once being part of the County of Middlesex – has a long history of the sport. Middlesex County Cricket Club is an important name in cricket history and, cricket fan or not, you will most likely be familiar with Middlesex’s home ground since 1877 – the MCC or Lords – ‘The Home of Cricket’ (and the home of one of the most coveted trophies in cricket – The Ashes!).

Group photo of cricketers (mostly) in their whites, possibly on Tottenham Marshes c.1865-70
Group photo of cricketers (mostly) in their whites, possibly on Tottenham Marshes c.1865-70
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Group of cricketeers showing the team of Joseph May whose family had owned the ‘Rose and Crown’ pub at the High Cross for over 100 years
Group of cricketeers showing the team of Joseph Mays (whose family had owned the ‘Rose and Crown’ pub at the High Cross for over 100 years) versus the Police of Tottenham team,
seen here at the ground of the Tottenham Cricket Club, Philip Lane, 1890.
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

Many cricketers born in (what is now) Haringey have played for Middlesex and other county teams. Some have even gone on to play for the national team. One such player was Percy Albert Perrin (1876-1945) who was one of the leading cricketers in England in the Edwardian ‘Golden Age’ of amateur cricket. The Perrin family had moved to Tottenham in 1878 where they ran two pubs, the ‘White Hart’ at Tottenham Hale and later ‘The Bull’ at 278 Tottenham High Road, which once stood near Tottenham Green (seen in the photograph below).

The Bull Pub From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
The Bull Pub From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

 

In 1892, Percy Perrin had started to play cricket for Tottenham Cricket Club, based off Philip Lane and in 1895 he broke several Tottenham batting records. His outstanding performances came to the attention of Essex County Club, then based at Leyton, and his long county cricket career started in 1896.

The Tottenham Cricket Club, just off Philip Lane as shown on the 1894 Ordnance Survey map. From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
The Tottenham Cricket Club, just off Philip Lane as shown on the 1894 Ordnance Survey map. From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

Percy had met Ethel, who lived locally in 11 Summerhill Road – not far from the cricket ground in Tottenham (you can read more about the Perrins on the Tottenham Summerhill Road website here – also notably, the house in Summerhill Road later became the family home of Ray and Alan Swain, who established the website). The Perrins were married in 1901 at St James’ Muswell Hill and moved to live at 194 Muswell Hill Road.

Percy had a remarkable career as a county cricketer, playing 496 matches in the County Championship – more than any other amateur. He scored more championship runs – 27,703 – than any other Essex player, including Graham Gooch. At Chesterfield in 1904, he scored the first first-class triple century in the 20th century – 343 not out – setting an Essex record which has lasted a hundred years. Shortly before he stopped playing cricket for Essex, he became a Test Match selector.

Percy Perrin in his Essex cap, c.1900
Percy Perrin in his Essex cap, c.1900

He remained a member of the Test selection committee for ten years, alongside the likes of Lord Hawke and Sir Stanley Jackson. Percy Perrin died at Hickling Broad, Norfolk just after the end of the Second World War.

Another notable cricketer with links to Tottenham (but originally relating to a different sport!) was William. J. Edrich (1916-1986), known as Bill, and who played cricket for Middlesex and England. Originally from Norfolk, Edrich was an outstanding sportsman, and a notable footballer, originally playing for Tottenham Hotspur Football Club, before then focussing on cricket from 1937. Perhaps the sunny international cricket circuit was more appealing to Edrich than the muddy football pitches of England? During his career he toured India, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand during the late 1930s and again after the Second World War.

For the amateur sportsmen during the late 19th to the mid-20th century, it wasn’t so unusual for footballers to play cricket, and vice-versa. Cricket, of course, would be played during the summer months and football during the winter.

 

And so we have the Hotspur Cricket Club actually predating the formation of the now famous football team – so it might possibly be argued that without cricket you wouldn’t have Tottenham Hotspur Football Club! But we’ll move quickly on from that controversial statement. (And for those who are interested in the very early years of THFC and its emergence from the cricket club, you can see this great brand new book about Bobby Buckle, one of the founding members of the team and its first captain.)

For another Tottenham local who made cricket their career, there was also Alan Moss (1930-2019) – making quite a few distinguished cricketers from the area.

Alongside the Tottenham clubs, there are some long club histories in other parts of the borough too, some of which are still running today. North Middlesex Cricket Club is a well-known name in cricket, with its grounds at 185a Park Road in Crouch End. In its early history, the club’s pavilion was targeted by arsonists in  – very likely part of the local suffragette protests at the time. You can read more about this incident and see images and newspaper reports from the time on Harringay Online here.

From the local newspapers of 1963, a 14-year-old Peter Hubert was interviewed with his father at Sutherland Road, Tottenham for an article. The young Peter had been selected to play cricket for Middlesex County schoolboys’ team (he also boxed for Middlesex too). The family had not long previously moved from Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), to Tottenham. For Peter, it was quite a feat for a student from a Secondary Modern School (Parkhurst) to be selected to play for Middlesex County under 15 cricket team. Does anyone else have a similar and local story to tell?

Alexandra Park Cricket Club was formed in 1888 – which at the time of their opening claimed to have the finest ground in north London. Who knows what the MCC thought of that! Or indeed the clowns clowning about whilst playing cricket at Alexandra Palace (below)?

the clowns clowning about whilst playing cricket at Alexandra Palace
the clowns clowning about whilst playing cricket at Alexandra Palace From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

 

The Hornsey Cricket Club is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year, having been formed in 1870 when two local clubs, the Hanover Cricket Club and the Phoenix Cricket Club merged. The new club was based at the ‘Maynard Arms’ – the pub was club’s pavilion, changing rooms and used to store the club’s equipment. It presumably was also used for the post-match celebrations or commiserations. The original ground was roughly where the junction of Tivoli Road and Wolseley Road now is, on the other side of Park Road to the Maynard Arms.

The Maynard Arms c.1900
The Maynard Arms c.1900 From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

Other pubs in Crouch End that had cricket teams include ‘The Railway Tavern’ in Crouch End Hill. The ‘Railway Taverners’ 1st cricket team can be seen in the photograph below in 1981. We can spot former councillor David Winskill, centre middle row, cradling a large Watney’s Party Seven bulk tin of Red Barrel bitter (the tin was an iconic sight of 1970s knees-ups), presumably for the celebration straight after the photograph (although beers in the pub might have been more flavoursome!).

The ‘Railway Taverners’ 1st cricket team can be seen in the photograph 1981
The ‘Railway Taverners’ 1st cricket team can be seen in the photograph 1981 -Courtesy the collection of David Winskill
Cricket Field, Highgate Wood, 1901 From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Cricket Field, Highgate Wood, 1901 From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

 

Wood Green County School (later Glendale School) Cricket Team c.1940s
Wood Green County School (later Glendale School) Cricket Team c.1940s
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service

School teams were often where most young boys had their first experience of the game but, as I noted before, cricket is not everyone’s cup of tea.

Here are some recollections from 1938 by long-time friend of Bruce Castle and contributor to some of our previous posts, Jim Clark (1925-2018), who was forced to play cricket as a boy at school during the 1930-40s:

“  The girls played hockey in winter and tennis in summer. Boys played cricket. This was almost as miserable for me [as rugby] though in a different way….

One was not in action the whole of the time – that was the only good thing about it. I didn’t properly understand the rules of this game either and could neither bat, bowl nor field effectively as you shall hear. I was assigned to the position of ‘long-stop’ as it was believed I would do less harm there. Wrong! When the ball passed the wicket-keeper I was not paying attention and the ball passed me as well. Shouts of abuse – meanwhile runs were being taken. I run after the ball, pick it up and throw it to the wicket-keeper, but I throw it short – more runs taken and more shouts of abuse.

Later in the match it becomes my turn to bat. My opposite number at the other end of the pitch is receiving the ball, so all I do is stand and wait. I look idly up at the sky and there is a loud shout of ‘RUN!’ It seems that the ball has been hit for one run and I see the other batsman running speedily towards me and had already reached more than halfway to my end….

I am bewildered – I see the bails come off at the other end, I am still in my crease so he is ‘out’! His temper was well frayed and he thought I should have been ‘out’. That would have suited me but they would not have it and I had to stay ‘in’, though was soon ‘out’ for no runs—hardly ‘the man of the match’. I made few friends on the cricket field. I trust I have made it clear why I was never nominated for the title “Sportsman of the Year”! ‘.

Tottenham vs Enfield Schools, October 1956 From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Tottenham vs Enfield Schools, October 1956 From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

 

Tottenham vs Enfield Schools, October 1956
Tottenham vs Enfield Schools, October 1956
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Broadwater Farm Estate Cricket Team c.1980s
Broadwater Farm Estate Cricket Team c.1980s
From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Mayor’s Charity cricket match, Wood Green, 1963
Mayor’s Charity cricket match, Wood Green, 1963 – with the Mayor of Wood Green for
1963-64, Councillor Mrs. L.A. Angell, JP, sitting in the middle
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
An early minute book of 1860 for Wood Green Cricket Club
An early minute book of 1860 for Wood Green Cricket Club
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

 

Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, 1980s
Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, 1980s
From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

Although the men’s fixtures have always received more media coverage than women’s cricket until recent years, women have been interested in playing cricket from very early on – as this image below of a cricket match between Hampshire and Surrey in Newington Green in 1811 shows.

a cricket match between Hampshire and Surrey in Newington Green in 1811
a cricket match between Hampshire and Surrey in Newington Green in 1811

Today, England and Wales have a world leading women’s cricket team, and there are women’s county cricket teams, local leagues and school teams for people to join. The cricket academy set up at the Selby Centre in Tottenham in the 1980s and 90s ran a dedicated training for women and girls.

Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, Girls’ Training Session with Jenny Wostram coaching, 1990
Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, Girls’ Training Session with Jenny Wostram coaching, 1990
From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, Girls’ Training Session 1990
Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, Girls’ Training Session 1990
From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

For any women interested in playing, the North London Cricket Club based at the Crouch End Playing Fields in Montenotte Road have a team who play league and friendlies – drop them a line.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the great variety of cricket’s terms and don’t know your ‘googly’ from your ‘grubber’ or your ‘tailender’ from your ‘twelfth-man’ – this link might help!.

And if anyone can put a name to any of the cricketers in our photographs, or indeed have any other memories or stories about cricketing – even like Jim’s! – please do get in touch.

Highgate Wood Cricket pavilion in the snow, 1950s.
Highgate Wood Cricket pavilion in the snow, 1950s.
From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

So we’ll sign off there, hoping for better weather conditions for the next Test – at least it’s not snowing!

Until our next post – take care, keep safe and well

Best wishes from us all at Bruce Castle

https://www.haringey.gov.uk/libraries-sport-and-leisure/culture-and-entertainment/exploring-haringey/bruce-castle-museum

 

Cricket: Welcome to Time Travel : Howzat!!

Cricket: Welcome to Time Travel : Howzat!!

Cricket: Welcome to Time Travel: Howzat!!

sharing our heritage from Bruce Castle Museum & Archive.

The game does tend to have a ‘marmite effect’ on people – you either love it or hate it. And the ever-changing aspects of the game can quickly cause schisms within the fans themselves. For some, it’s only the Test Matches that count. For others, the game’s ability to be transformed into a series of explosive big hits and run-outs, with one day matches or T20 games, is part of its beauty.

Watching cricket in the field by Mr Cole’s Potteries in White Hart Lane, Wood Green c.1888.
Watching cricket in the field by Mr Cole’s Potteries in White Hart Lane, Wood Green c.1888.
Fromthe collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

Haringey – once being part of the County of Middlesex – has a long history of the sport. Middlesex County Cricket Club is an important name in cricket history and, cricket fan or not, you will most likely be familiar with Middlesex’s home ground since 1877 – the MCC or Lords – ‘The Home of Cricket’ (and the home of one of the most coveted trophies in cricket – The Ashes!).

Group photo of cricketers (mostly) in their whites, possibly on Tottenham Marshes c.1865-70
Group photo of cricketers (mostly) in their whites, possibly on Tottenham Marshes c.1865-70
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Group of cricketeers showing the team of Joseph May whose family had owned the ‘Rose and Crown’ pub at the High Cross for over 100 years
Group of cricketeers showing the team of Joseph Mays (whose family had owned the ‘Rose and Crown’ pub at the High Cross for over 100 years) versus the Police of Tottenham team,
seen here at the ground of the Tottenham Cricket Club, Philip Lane, 1890.
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

Many cricketers born in (what is now) Haringey have played for Middlesex and other county teams. Some have even gone on to play for the national team. One such player was Percy Albert Perrin (1876-1945) who was one of the leading cricketers in England in the Edwardian ‘Golden Age’ of amateur cricket. The Perrin family had moved to Tottenham in 1878 where they ran two pubs, the ‘White Hart’ at Tottenham Hale and later ‘The Bull’ at 278 Tottenham High Road, which once stood near Tottenham Green (seen in the photograph below).

The Bull Pub From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
The Bull Pub From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

 

In 1892, Percy Perrin had started to play cricket for Tottenham Cricket Club, based off Philip Lane and in 1895 he broke several Tottenham batting records. His outstanding performances came to the attention of Essex County Club, then based at Leyton, and his long county cricket career started in 1896.

The Tottenham Cricket Club, just off Philip Lane as shown on the 1894 Ordnance Survey map. From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
The Tottenham Cricket Club, just off Philip Lane as shown on the 1894 Ordnance Survey map. From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

Percy had met Ethel, who lived locally in 11 Summerhill Road – not far from the cricket ground in Tottenham (you can read more about the Perrins on the Tottenham Summerhill Road website here – also notably, the house in Summerhill Road later became the family home of Ray and Alan Swain, who established the website). The Perrins were married in 1901 at St James’ Muswell Hill and moved to live at 194 Muswell Hill Road.

Percy had a remarkable career as a county cricketer, playing 496 matches in the County Championship – more than any other amateur. He scored more championship runs – 27,703 – than any other Essex player, including Graham Gooch. At Chesterfield in 1904, he scored the first first-class triple century in the 20th century – 343 not out – setting an Essex record which has lasted a hundred years. Shortly before he stopped playing cricket for Essex, he became a Test Match selector.

Percy Perrin in his Essex cap, c.1900
Percy Perrin in his Essex cap, c.1900

He remained a member of the Test selection committee for ten years, alongside the likes of Lord Hawke and Sir Stanley Jackson. Percy Perrin died at Hickling Broad, Norfolk just after the end of the Second World War.

Another notable cricketer with links to Tottenham (but originally relating to a different sport!) was William. J. Edrich (1916-1986), known as Bill, and who played cricket for Middlesex and England. Originally from Norfolk, Edrich was an outstanding sportsman, and a notable footballer, originally playing for Tottenham Hotspur Football Club, before then focussing on cricket from 1937. Perhaps the sunny international cricket circuit was more appealing to Edrich than the muddy football pitches of England? During his career he toured India, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand during the late 1930s and again after the Second World War.

For the amateur sportsmen during the late 19th to the mid-20th century, it wasn’t so unusual for footballers to play cricket, and vice-versa. Cricket, of course, would be played during the summer months and football during the winter.

 

And so we have the Hotspur Cricket Club actually predating the formation of the now famous football team – so it might possibly be argued that without cricket you wouldn’t have Tottenham Hotspur Football Club! But we’ll move quickly on from that controversial statement. (And for those who are interested in the very early years of THFC and its emergence from the cricket club, you can see this great brand new book about Bobby Buckle, one of the founding members of the team and its first captain.)

For another Tottenham local who made cricket their career, there was also Alan Moss (1930-2019) – making quite a few distinguished cricketers from the area.

Alongside the Tottenham clubs, there are some long club histories in other parts of the borough too, some of which are still running today. North Middlesex Cricket Club is a well-known name in cricket, with its grounds at 185a Park Road in Crouch End. In its early history, the club’s pavilion was targeted by arsonists in  – very likely part of the local suffragette protests at the time. You can read more about this incident and see images and newspaper reports from the time on Harringay Online here.

From the local newspapers of 1963, a 14-year-old Peter Hubert was interviewed with his father at Sutherland Road, Tottenham for an article. The young Peter had been selected to play cricket for Middlesex County schoolboys’ team (he also boxed for Middlesex too). The family had not long previously moved from Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), to Tottenham. For Peter, it was quite a feat for a student from a Secondary Modern School (Parkhurst) to be selected to play for Middlesex County under 15 cricket team. Does anyone else have a similar and local story to tell?

Alexandra Park Cricket Club was formed in 1888 – which at the time of their opening claimed to have the finest ground in north London. Who knows what the MCC thought of that! Or indeed the clowns clowning about whilst playing cricket at Alexandra Palace (below)?

the clowns clowning about whilst playing cricket at Alexandra Palace
the clowns clowning about whilst playing cricket at Alexandra Palace From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

 

The Hornsey Cricket Club is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year, having been formed in 1870 when two local clubs, the Hanover Cricket Club and the Phoenix Cricket Club merged. The new club was based at the ‘Maynard Arms’ – the pub was club’s pavilion, changing rooms and used to store the club’s equipment. It presumably was also used for the post-match celebrations or commiserations. The original ground was roughly where the junction of Tivoli Road and Wolseley Road now is, on the other side of Park Road to the Maynard Arms.

The Maynard Arms c.1900
The Maynard Arms c.1900 From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

Other pubs in Crouch End that had cricket teams include ‘The Railway Tavern’ in Crouch End Hill. The ‘Railway Taverners’ 1st cricket team can be seen in the photograph below in 1981. We can spot former councillor David Winskill, centre middle row, cradling a large Watney’s Party Seven bulk tin of Red Barrel bitter (the tin was an iconic sight of 1970s knees-ups), presumably for the celebration straight after the photograph (although beers in the pub might have been more flavoursome!).

The ‘Railway Taverners’ 1st cricket team can be seen in the photograph 1981
The ‘Railway Taverners’ 1st cricket team can be seen in the photograph 1981 -Courtesy the collection of David Winskill
Cricket Field, Highgate Wood, 1901 From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Cricket Field, Highgate Wood, 1901 From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

 

Wood Green County School (later Glendale School) Cricket Team c.1940s
Wood Green County School (later Glendale School) Cricket Team c.1940s
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service

School teams were often where most young boys had their first experience of the game but, as I noted before, cricket is not everyone’s cup of tea.

Here are some recollections from 1938 by long-time friend of Bruce Castle and contributor to some of our previous posts, Jim Clark (1925-2018), who was forced to play cricket as a boy at school during the 1930-40s:

“  The girls played hockey in winter and tennis in summer. Boys played cricket. This was almost as miserable for me [as rugby] though in a different way….

One was not in action the whole of the time – that was the only good thing about it. I didn’t properly understand the rules of this game either and could neither bat, bowl nor field effectively as you shall hear. I was assigned to the position of ‘long-stop’ as it was believed I would do less harm there. Wrong! When the ball passed the wicket-keeper I was not paying attention and the ball passed me as well. Shouts of abuse – meanwhile runs were being taken. I run after the ball, pick it up and throw it to the wicket-keeper, but I throw it short – more runs taken and more shouts of abuse.

Later in the match it becomes my turn to bat. My opposite number at the other end of the pitch is receiving the ball, so all I do is stand and wait. I look idly up at the sky and there is a loud shout of ‘RUN!’ It seems that the ball has been hit for one run and I see the other batsman running speedily towards me and had already reached more than halfway to my end….

I am bewildered – I see the bails come off at the other end, I am still in my crease so he is ‘out’! His temper was well frayed and he thought I should have been ‘out’. That would have suited me but they would not have it and I had to stay ‘in’, though was soon ‘out’ for no runs—hardly ‘the man of the match’. I made few friends on the cricket field. I trust I have made it clear why I was never nominated for the title “Sportsman of the Year”! ‘.

Tottenham vs Enfield Schools, October 1956 From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Tottenham vs Enfield Schools, October 1956 From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

 

Tottenham vs Enfield Schools, October 1956
Tottenham vs Enfield Schools, October 1956
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Broadwater Farm Estate Cricket Team c.1980s
Broadwater Farm Estate Cricket Team c.1980s
From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Mayor’s Charity cricket match, Wood Green, 1963
Mayor’s Charity cricket match, Wood Green, 1963 – with the Mayor of Wood Green for
1963-64, Councillor Mrs. L.A. Angell, JP, sitting in the middle
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
An early minute book of 1860 for Wood Green Cricket Club
An early minute book of 1860 for Wood Green Cricket Club
From the collections and © Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

 

Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, 1980s
Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, 1980s
From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

Although the men’s fixtures have always received more media coverage than women’s cricket until recent years, women have been interested in playing cricket from very early on – as this image below of a cricket match between Hampshire and Surrey in Newington Green in 1811 shows.

a cricket match between Hampshire and Surrey in Newington Green in 1811
a cricket match between Hampshire and Surrey in Newington Green in 1811

Today, England and Wales have a world leading women’s cricket team, and there are women’s county cricket teams, local leagues and school teams for people to join. The cricket academy set up at the Selby Centre in Tottenham in the 1980s and 90s ran a dedicated training for women and girls.

Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, Girls’ Training Session with Jenny Wostram coaching, 1990
Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, Girls’ Training Session with Jenny Wostram coaching, 1990
From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)
Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, Girls’ Training Session 1990
Haringey Cricket College, Selby Centre, Girls’ Training Session 1990
From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

For any women interested in playing, the North London Cricket Club based at the Crouch End Playing Fields in Montenotte Road have a team who play league and friendlies – drop them a line.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the great variety of cricket’s terms and don’t know your ‘googly’ from your ‘grubber’ or your ‘tailender’ from your ‘twelfth-man’ – this link might help!.

And if anyone can put a name to any of the cricketers in our photographs, or indeed have any other memories or stories about cricketing – even like Jim’s! – please do get in touch.

Highgate Wood Cricket pavilion in the snow, 1950s.
Highgate Wood Cricket pavilion in the snow, 1950s.
From the collections of Bruce Castle Museum (Haringey Archive and Museum Service)

So we’ll sign off there, hoping for better weather conditions for the next Test – at least it’s not snowing!

Until our next post – take care, keep safe and well

Best wishes from us all at Bruce Castle

https://www.haringey.gov.uk/libraries-sport-and-leisure/culture-and-entertainment/exploring-haringey/bruce-castle-museum

 

BCEW: Cancellation of 2020 Blind Cricket Season

BCEW Announce Cancellation of 2020 Blind Cricket Season

BCEW Announce Cancellation of  2020 Blind Cricket Season

original post on the bcew website

We’re very sorry to have to inform everyone that after carefully examining the Return To Cricket Regulations and speaking with the ECB we have now reached the point where BCEW have no option but to call off all competitive cricket for the 2020 season.

For the avoidance of doubt this does include the Development Festival.

We would also strongly advise against playing any friendly matches as based on the Return To Cricket Regulations we cannot see how a VI game could be staged safely and within the rules.

We list below the Return To VI Cricket rules that YOU MUST FOLLOW if you are going to attempt a friendly. These are not negotiable and cannot be ignored, any club failing to follow them risk sanction by the ECB. Whilst these have a few adaptions for the VI game they are not significantly different to those red ball cricket have to follow and most are in fact identical.

This Decision Has Also Prompted the Following Set Of Announcements:
* All 2020 cup draws will carry over to the 2021 season.
* All league structures will remain the same for the 2021 season.
* All entry fees received for the 2020 season will carry forward to the 2021 season.
* As no competitive cricket has been played in 2020 all sight tests will be extended by one year so that they will still have been valid for four seasons.
* BCEW will not have any end of season awards in 2020.
* As a one off the 2020 BCEW AGM will be held via Zoom, this will be in November.
* AGM Voting rights will be the same as at the 2019 AGM as no cricket has been played in 2020 and therefore nobody’s eligibility to vote has changed.

Return To VI Cricket Rules

General Principles:
1. Cricket activity must only take place outside.
2. Players must not use public transport to get to venues.
3. Where car sharing or use of minibuses is considered this must comply with government guidelines on social distancing. For minibus travel all on board must be seated at least two meters apart unless they are from the same household or social bubble.
4. 11 a side cricket will be allowed but with no more than a total of 30 people at the ground. This includes players, match officials, coaches, spectators and anyone else who is present.
5. A hygiene break must be held every 20 minutes or every 6 overs, whichever happens sooner. During each break the ball must be thoroughly cleaned with an anti-bacterial wipe. All players must also clean their hands during each break using hand sanitizer. All of this must also take place at drinks breaks and the start or finish of any innings. The fielding captain will be responsible for cleaning the ball, not the umpires.
6. Participants not adhering to COVID-19 rules, face punishment including but not limited to, player ejection and match cancellation.
7. In the event of rain, participants should return to their own vehicle to maintain social distancing if there is insufficient outdoor cover from the rain to maintain social distancing.

Cricket Specific Rules:
A. Anyone involved in a match must not attend if they have any CoronaVirus symptoms or if they have been told to self-isolate or to shield.
B. In all friendly matches the wicketkeeper must stand at least 2 metres back from the stumps
C. In all friendly matches all fielders must be a minimum of two metres apart
D. In all friendly matches all fielders must be a minimum of 2 metres back from the edge of the playing strip, those in front of or level with the wicket must stay at least 4 metres back from the strip, this is to comply with the rules on running between the wickets.
E. Players running between the wickets must do this using a line 2 metres away from the popping crease, this must also be two metres from the close fielders in the case of VI cricket. It is essential that when running players stay two metres away from the bowler, the other batsman or runner and all fielders.
F. Participants should under take personal hygiene measures at home before and after matches.
G. Participants should bring there own hand sanitizer to games where possible and should maintain strict and frequent hand hygiene measures at all times.
H. Hand sanitizer must be used before the match starts, at every break in play, before leaving the ground and before eating or drinking.
I. Players should refrain from spitting or rinsing out their mouths.
J. Club representatives should ensure all participants are aware of expected social distancing and hygiene requirements.
K. Club representatives should ensure that all players are aware that they are increasing the risk to themselves of infection by participating and that participation must be strictly optional without pressure placed on anyone to take part.
L. Players should arrive already changed and ready to begin the warm up.
M. Time spent at venues prior to any match should be minimised, meet up times should reflect this.
N. Bats, helmets and other equipment cannot be shared.
O. Bowlers must not hand any personal items or items of their own equipment to the umpires, they must place these at the boundary themselves.
P. When leaving the field all batters must sanitize their bats and all wicketkeepers must sanitize their gloves.
Q. In line with current UK Government guidance, clubs should not prepare food for participants. Individuals should bring their own food and drink for ‘teas’ or practice. Water bottles or other refreshment containers should not be shared.
R. After games social gatherings will be allowed but only inline with government guidelines on hospitality.
S. One club representative should be responsible for collecting and disinfecting the stumps, balls, boundary markers and fielder exclusion zone disks at the end of each match.
T. During any practice or training sessions stumps, balls, etc must be disinfected between groups of players using them.
U. Clubs must have a record of all players, officials, coaches and spectators present at any match or training session. This record must be held for at least 21 days after the event in case NHS Track and Trace need the information.
V. If two scorers are required for a match only one may use the scorers box and if outside they must stay 2 metres apart. No players may enter the score box if it is being used for the match. Scorebooks may not be passed from the scorer to any other official or player.
W. Social distancing must be observed when celebrating wickets, during drinks breaks, having tactical discussions and by spectators.
X. The number of people touching the ball should be minimized, spectators should not return or stop the ball whilst on field the ball should be returned to the bowler by the most direct route with as fewer fielders as possible involved.
Y. Umpires should not have any contact with the ball but should be the only people replacing the stumps if they are knocked over or they need to be realigned.
Z. During the toss the coin should be provided by the person tossing it and it should not be handed to anyone else.
AA. Pre and Post Match Handshakes should not take place, hand contact of any kind should be avoided during all matches.

NB Further rules exist for those who run their own ground, for coaches, for training activities and for matches between junior teams. We can provide these on request.

original post on the bcew website

 All at metro are Very sorry to hear this news,  but we will look forward to play resuming in 2021

Blind & Partially Sighted Cricket Fielding Drills Video

Rose and Martin Demonstrate two VI Cricket Drills in a Video!

Blind & Partially Sighted Cricket Fielding Drills Video

Two Blind & Partially Sighted Cricket Fielding Drills to try at home in this Video from Rose with her helper Martin Symcox

“In the first Cricket fielding drill, Rose asks if Martin is ready and then throws the ball so that it bounces and Martin needs to catch it and in the second, Rose asks if Martin is ready and then rolls the ball along the ground and martin has to stop it”

Rose and Martin Demonstrate VI Cricket Drills Video below:

Click on the play button to the bottom left to play video

 

You can check out more blind and partially sighted cricket videos below: blindsport.uk/CricketVids

 

 

 

 

Have a Go Day: Northhampton!

Have a Go Day Northamptonshire with British Blind Sport 25 April 2020

British Blind Sport brings their  Have a Go Day to Northampton in 2020!

British Blind Sport is working in partnership with Northamptonshire Sport and Northampton Association for the Blind to deliver a sports taster event for people living with sight loss.

British Blind Sport’s “Have a Go Days” have been running successfully for 4 years all across the UK, giving children and adults living with a visual impairment the chance to try inclusive and adapted sports and physical activity in a safe and supported environment. As well as trying out different activities, the Have a Go Day is also a chance for attendees to meet industry professionals and other people in their local area who want to take steps towards being more active.

These events aim to provide participants with a pathway for continuing to be active in the future by inviting coaches from local VI-friendly clubs and community groups to run sessions during the day and give attendees the chance to try out something new and fun, which is also available in their location for them to continue after the event. So far, the confirmed sports that will be available at the Northampton Have a Go Day are Football, Cricket, Guide Running, Judo and Acoustic Shooting…with many more to be confirmed!

This event is completely free and is open to anyone with a visual impairment. BBS encourages participants to bring along family and friends to get involved alongside them! No matter if you’re already a fully-fledged sport player or haven’t kicked a football in many years, British Blind Sport encourages everyone to come along and “have a go”.

The Northampton Have a Go Day will take place on Saturday 25th April at Kingsthorpe College, Boughton Green Road, Northampton, NN2 7HR from 10am – 3pm.

“Have a Go Days” have always been extremely popular, and so we encourage anyone who wants to attend to register their interest the event! We have received the below feedback from previous participants;

“Thanks for a great day, it’s been a great confidence builder for my daughter and she’s really enjoyed it! Look forward to the next time.” Parent of participant, Norwich Have a Go Day 2019

 “The whole day was extremely well organised and each session was well structured. I learnt a lot about different sports available to visually impaired people and had lots of fun too! It is also good to have lots of visually impaired people meeting together to share experiences and ideas.” Participant, Leicester Have a Go Day 2019

 “A fantastic day! Very useful and also inspiring!” Participant, Leicester Have a Go Day 2019

 Registration is required prior to the event and is available on the British Blind Sport website: www.britishblindsport.org.uk/have-a-go-day-northampton/

For further details, contact Alex Pitts, National Partnerships Manager, on 01926 424247 or email alex@britishblindsport.org.uk

British Blind Sport are always grateful of the support of volunteers to help out at these events. If you can spare some time to help the attendees to enjoy the day fully, please get in touch.