Tag Archives: British Blind Sport

BBS & England Athletics Guide Running Update

BBS & England Athletics Guide Running Update

BRITISH BLIND SPORT AND ENGLAND ATHLETICS GUIDE RUNNING UPDATE

As lockdown restrictions across the UK are being changed, British Blind Sport has been working closely with England Athletics to update guidance on the status of guide running in England.

The government recommendations are that people remain 2 metres apart, or 1 metre with extra protection measures, therefore we understand that extra modification is essential on account of a disability or impairment.

As such, guide running can once again begin to take place as long as both guide and visually impaired runner fully understand the increased risk associated with the activity and follow the mitigations included in the updated guidance.

Guide running should ideally take place with participants running side by side and should only take place outdoors. You should maintain social distancing from other people when out running and ensure that hands are washed before and after activity. We also recommend that running tethers are thoroughly cleaned between uses.

Ideally, where possible, both parties should be from within the same household or support bubble to decrease risk of the virus spreading. However, if this is not possible then guide running should take place between the same pair until further lifting of restrictions are advised (i.e. guide runners only run with one VI runner and vice versa).

It is also important that guide and VI runner have up to date contact details for one another, for track and trace purposes.

Please be aware that neither British Blind Sport nor England Athletics can take responsibility for any risk, injury or illness incurred during guide running and that all participants must fully understand the risk that they are taking on by resuming this activity.

If you have any queries, please get in touch by emailing info@britishblindsport.org.uk or phoning the BBS office on 01926 424247.

For further information from England Athletics, click here to view the updated guidance on the England Athletics website – included in the three guidance documents for Athletes & Runners, Coaches & Leaders, and Road Running Coaches.

 

 

Return to Play: Sports and Leisure Sector Guidance

RNIB BBS & Metro Blind Sport's Best Practice Leisure Guidelines

RNIB, British Blind Sport, Metro Blind Sport and Visionary issue guidance for leisure operators to support the return of blind and partially sighted people

In preparation for the reopening of leisure and sport facilities, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), British Blind Sport (BBS), Metro Blind Sport and Visionary have been working together to provide practical guidance to support the return of blind and partially sighted people to physical activity.

Research conducted by RNIB has found that two thirds (66 per cent) of blind and partially sighted people feel less independent now compared to before lockdown, demonstrating that social distancing measures, as brought in to tackle the Covid-19 pandemic, are incredibly difficult for many people living with sight loss. In addition, inaccessible signage and fear about how the public will react to them if they are unable to follow the guidelines is causing increased stress and worry.

In response to these anxieties, RNIB, BBS, Metro and Visionary have created practical guidance which will help leisure operators and sport providers prepare for welcoming people back to physical activity, with the least amount of stress and difficulty. The guidance provides simple considerations that will make the return more straightforward and encourages the wider public to be mindful that sight loss may not always be obvious. The guidance demonstrates how to communicate clearly any changes to the facilities, particularly floor indicators or arrows, protective screens and temporary barriers.

Marc Powell, Strategic Accessibility Lead at RNIB, said: “The findings from RNIB’s survey clearly show how much of a significant impact social distancing measures are having on the lives of blind and partially sighted people. As lockdown restrictions ease, we’ve increasingly heard from people with sight loss who are incredibly anxious about how to manage the situation. By creating clear, implementable guidance for leisure operators, we hope that some pressure and stress will be relieved for blind and partially sighted people, and that we will make the general public more aware of the challenges being faced by our community during this time.”

Alaina MacGregor, Chief Executive at BBS, said “During the pandemic, blind and partially sighted people have been facing specific and unique challenges that have had an enormous impact on everyday independence. We have been interested to learn about the issues that people with sight loss have faced due to social distancing particularly visual cues in public places. To ensure that these issues are not repeated in the sporting environment, together we have created clear and easy to follow guidance that can be put into place for safe return to play. This guidance will make a huge difference to people who want to return to living independent lives and will offer additional assistance to the organisations who provide inclusive physical activity opportunities.”

Martin Symcox, Chief Executive at Metro Blind Sport, said: “People with sight loss have faced significant difficulties in observing social distancing since lockdown has been in place and again since it has been relaxed. Many individuals have told us that they are worried about returning to physical activity without any clear guidance in place and are unsure of the new barriers that they may face. We hope that we have made it simple and cost effective for our suggested measures to be implemented before facilities reopen and that this will give blind and partially sighted people the confidence and reassurance they need to return to the activities that they enjoy.”

all Metro Blind Sport work is  kindly supported by Thomas Pocklington Trust
TPT Logo

Please click here to read the new Sport and Leisure Sector Guidance

For more information on this guidance, please contact Marc Powell on marc.powell@rnib.org.uk

 

First Steps Goes National! – British Blind Sport

Take your child's First Steps towards a happy and active life!

British Blind Sport take their First Steps right across the country!

At BBS we are helping children with sight loss get active with a free sport and fitness pack delivered straight to their door. Our First Steps pack helps children to build confidence, develop skills and, most importantly, have fun.

If your child is aged 3 – 11 with a visual impairment and wants to become active for life, then it’s time for them to start their journey with Jangles!

Sign up now to our First Steps project and receive;

  • Audible Ball (aka Jangles)  A bright and bouncy ball called Jangles with ball-bearings inside to allow the child to hear the ball.
  • Exciting Activity Booklet – Simple and enjoyable games that encourage the entire family to play together.
  • Progress Stickers
  • Progress Poster -Tracking each child’s achievements to encourage habitual behaviour with a fun sticker chart
  • 1-1 support from our First Steps Officer

Email: firststeps@britishblindsport.org.uk

Call: 01926 424247

For more information, visit: http://www.bit.ly/BBSFirstSteps

BBS’ aim is that the First Steps pack will help children learn the basics in a fun and supportive environment so that they can grow in confidence and capability and then be able to take their next steps to a healthy lifestyle by joining into activities and sports clubs in their local areas.

Feedback from a parent whose child has participated in the programme said, “My little one can now kick a ball, which he couldn’t manage at the start of this project. He can now confidently throw the ball very well and if close enough, he can catch the ball.  This is amazing progress for my little boy.”

Another said, “Our daughter now attends disability football with Wolves FC after we learnt about it at the Have a Go Day. She also goes swimming and we had the confidence to move her from the toddler class to being in the pool with her own age group.”

Alaina MacGregor, Chief Executive Officer at British Blind Sport, is looking forward to seeing the impact that the project has across the nation.  Alaina said, “First Steps is a project very close to our hearts at British Blind Sport and we’re so pleased to see it develop nationwide.  It has had huge success in the areas it has previously been introduced to, with all members of the family benefitting from the unique aspects of the project.  Siblings are able to play together more independently, parents are able to see a marked different in their child’s physical ability and children with a visual impairment grow in confidence and ability so much that they are able to join in with local, accessible activities, which they may not have felt comfortable or able to do before they met Jangles!”

Jane Jacobs, First Steps Officer, said, “I’m really excited to be taking First Steps nationally.  It is a lovely project and we’ve already seen the difference it has made to the families in the regional roll out.  Now, we get to meet and help families all across the UK and show them the difference that physical activity can have upon their child’s development and general happiness.  I can’t wait to start meeting the families and help them take their first steps toward an active life!”

For more information, visit: http://www.bit.ly/BBSFirstSteps

 

Return to Play: Sports and Leisure Sector Guidance

RNIB BBS & Metro Blind Sport's Best Practice Leisure Guidelines

RNIB, British Blind Sport, Metro Blind Sport and Visionary issue guidance for leisure operators to support the return of blind and partially sighted people

In preparation for the reopening of leisure and sport facilities, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), British Blind Sport (BBS), Metro Blind Sport and Visionary have been working together to provide practical guidance to support the return of blind and partially sighted people to physical activity.

Research conducted by RNIB has found that two thirds (66 per cent) of blind and partially sighted people feel less independent now compared to before lockdown, demonstrating that social distancing measures, as brought in to tackle the Covid-19 pandemic, are incredibly difficult for many people living with sight loss. In addition, inaccessible signage and fear about how the public will react to them if they are unable to follow the guidelines is causing increased stress and worry.

In response to these anxieties, RNIB, BBS, Metro and Visionary have created practical guidance which will help leisure operators and sport providers prepare for welcoming people back to physical activity, with the least amount of stress and difficulty. The guidance provides simple considerations that will make the return more straightforward and encourages the wider public to be mindful that sight loss may not always be obvious. The guidance demonstrates how to communicate clearly any changes to the facilities, particularly floor indicators or arrows, protective screens and temporary barriers.

Marc Powell, Strategic Accessibility Lead at RNIB, said: “The findings from RNIB’s survey clearly show how much of a significant impact social distancing measures are having on the lives of blind and partially sighted people. As lockdown restrictions ease, we’ve increasingly heard from people with sight loss who are incredibly anxious about how to manage the situation. By creating clear, implementable guidance for leisure operators, we hope that some pressure and stress will be relieved for blind and partially sighted people, and that we will make the general public more aware of the challenges being faced by our community during this time.”

Alaina MacGregor, Chief Executive at BBS, said “During the pandemic, blind and partially sighted people have been facing specific and unique challenges that have had an enormous impact on everyday independence. We have been interested to learn about the issues that people with sight loss have faced due to social distancing particularly visual cues in public places. To ensure that these issues are not repeated in the sporting environment, together we have created clear and easy to follow guidance that can be put into place for safe return to play. This guidance will make a huge difference to people who want to return to living independent lives and will offer additional assistance to the organisations who provide inclusive physical activity opportunities.”

Martin Symcox, Chief Executive at Metro Blind Sport, said: “People with sight loss have faced significant difficulties in observing social distancing since lockdown has been in place and again since it has been relaxed. Many individuals have told us that they are worried about returning to physical activity without any clear guidance in place and are unsure of the new barriers that they may face. We hope that we have made it simple and cost effective for our suggested measures to be implemented before facilities reopen and that this will give blind and partially sighted people the confidence and reassurance they need to return to the activities that they enjoy.”

Please click here to read the new Sport and Leisure Sector Guidance

For more information on this guidance, please contact Marc Powell on marc.powell@rnib.org.uk

 

 

eLearning Course: Coaching People with a Visual Impairment

British Blind Sport and UK Coaching have created a new eLearning course 'Coaching People with a Visual Impairment'.

Coaching People with a Visual Impairment

British Blind Sport and UK Coaching have created a new eLearning course ‘Coaching People with a Visual Impairment’.

original article on britishblindsport.org.uk/

This new course raises awareness of the crucial role coaches’ play in helping people with visual impairments (VI) overcome barriers to participation in sport and physical activity, complementing UK Coaching’s ‘Person-centred’ principle of great coaching.

Tennis Coach, coaching two people with a visual impairment
Complete this course and you will feel more confident including people with a visual impairment in your sports and activity sessions.

Packed full of helpful tips, practical solutions and vibrant videos*, the 6 modules will increase your knowledge, assurance and skills to be able to coach people with a visual impairment.

“It’s really important the coach education starts at grassroots. There are still too many coaches who aren’t confident around visually impaired people.”

Sophie Thornhill, Paralympic Champion

  • Gain a greater understanding of sight loss and eye conditions
  • Explore practical solutions to barriers to participation and help meet individual needs
  • Explore some of the safety considerations to ensure a fully accessible and inclusive environment for people with a visual impairment
  • Learn how to make adaptations to specific elements of session planning and delivery using the STEP model
  • Understand how to communicate effectively and guide individual
  • Plus, you will be able to print out the UK Coaching and British Blind Sport certificate confirming you have completed the course
Coach guides a swimmer at the poolside.

 

Cost

£8.99 for non-BBS member and £5.99 for members after discount.

Please note: Members of British Blind Sport can enjoy a 33% discount on this course. To get your discount code, contact British Blind Sport on 01926 424 247 or email info@britishblindsport.org.uk

Ready to give it a try? Why not take a FREE Demo.

Accessibility

This course has been designed with accessibility in mind and has been rigorously tested. We aim to make the experience as accessible and easy to use as possible. This course works on desktop, tablets and mobile phones. For the best experience, we recommend you complete it on a desktop using Google Chrome.

If you have a visual impairment, we have designed the course to work with screen readers:

  • HTML5: JAWS 16 or later with Internet Explorer 10 or later, Google Chrome (latest version), Firefox (latest version)
  • Flash: JAWS 16 or later with Internet Explorer 11

Visit the UK Coaching website to take a FREE Demo of Coaching People with a Visual Impairment

* All videos come with downloadable manuscripts to illustrate the video in further detail along with audio descriptions where possible.