Tag Archives: British Blind Sport

First Steps Goes National! – British Blind Sport

Take your child's First Steps towards a happy and active life!

British Blind Sport take their First Steps right across the country!

At BBS we are helping children with sight loss get active with a free sport and fitness pack delivered straight to their door. Our First Steps pack helps children to build confidence, develop skills and, most importantly, have fun.

If your child is aged 3 – 11 with a visual impairment and wants to become active for life, then it’s time for them to start their journey with Jangles!

Sign up now to our First Steps project and receive;

  • Audible Ball (aka Jangles)  A bright and bouncy ball called Jangles with ball-bearings inside to allow the child to hear the ball.
  • Exciting Activity Booklet – Simple and enjoyable games that encourage the entire family to play together.
  • Progress Stickers
  • Progress Poster -Tracking each child’s achievements to encourage habitual behaviour with a fun sticker chart
  • 1-1 support from our First Steps Officer

Email: firststeps@britishblindsport.org.uk

Call: 01926 424247

For more information, visit: http://www.bit.ly/BBSFirstSteps

BBS’ aim is that the First Steps pack will help children learn the basics in a fun and supportive environment so that they can grow in confidence and capability and then be able to take their next steps to a healthy lifestyle by joining into activities and sports clubs in their local areas.

Feedback from a parent whose child has participated in the programme said, “My little one can now kick a ball, which he couldn’t manage at the start of this project. He can now confidently throw the ball very well and if close enough, he can catch the ball.  This is amazing progress for my little boy.”

Another said, “Our daughter now attends disability football with Wolves FC after we learnt about it at the Have a Go Day. She also goes swimming and we had the confidence to move her from the toddler class to being in the pool with her own age group.”

Alaina MacGregor, Chief Executive Officer at British Blind Sport, is looking forward to seeing the impact that the project has across the nation.  Alaina said, “First Steps is a project very close to our hearts at British Blind Sport and we’re so pleased to see it develop nationwide.  It has had huge success in the areas it has previously been introduced to, with all members of the family benefitting from the unique aspects of the project.  Siblings are able to play together more independently, parents are able to see a marked different in their child’s physical ability and children with a visual impairment grow in confidence and ability so much that they are able to join in with local, accessible activities, which they may not have felt comfortable or able to do before they met Jangles!”

Jane Jacobs, First Steps Officer, said, “I’m really excited to be taking First Steps nationally.  It is a lovely project and we’ve already seen the difference it has made to the families in the regional roll out.  Now, we get to meet and help families all across the UK and show them the difference that physical activity can have upon their child’s development and general happiness.  I can’t wait to start meeting the families and help them take their first steps toward an active life!”

For more information, visit: http://www.bit.ly/BBSFirstSteps

 

Best Practice Leisure Guidelines

RNIB BBS & Metro Blind Sport's Best Practice Leisure Guidelines

Best Practice Covid-19 Leisure Guidelines from RNIB, BBS and Metro Blind Sport

Covid-19: Supporting your blind and partially sighted members and participants. With a little support blind and partially sighted people can stay safe whilst being active.

 

1. Visual indicators and awareness

Be aware of who could be blind and partially sighted

It’s important to remember that blind and partially sighted people don’t necessarily “look blind”. Not all blind and partially sighted people wear dark glasses, have a cane or a guide dog, so be mindful that it may not always be obvious.

If you think that someone might require assistance or they have a visual indicator (which includes wearing the sunflower lanyard), a simple introduction and “Is there anything I can assist you with?”, can go a long way.

Staff Introduce yourself as customers may not see your uniform/name tag – “Hi I’m Steve, I’m your Duty Manager, is there anything I can do to help today?”.

Social distancing Research carried out by RNIB found that almost two-thirds of blind or partially sighted people say they’ve found maintaining a social distance difficult – guide dogs are amazing animals, but they are unaware that social distancing is in force.
Potential announcements such as: “Please maintain your social distance and consider others around you.” could help to support all your members.

For more information on the challenges of social distancing, please refer to RNIB’s short video:

‘How to socially distance when this is your view’

 

2. Inside the facility and customer experience Guiding

We know that sticking to government guidelines and social distancing is very important at this time, but RNIB research shows that 48% of blind or partially sighted people were concerned or anxious about following social distancing guidance correctly. Guiding someone who is blind or partially sighted around your facilities in the “traditional way” is not currently an option.

Therefore, if someone requires guiding and there is not a safe and comfortable way in which social distancing measures can be adhered to, especially in the context of active participation or whilst using equipment, verbal guidance may need to be considered.

3. Colour contrast

Be mindful of the visual appearance of any temporary signage, ensuring there is clear colour contrast – otherwise blind and partially sighted customers may not be able to read them. Also, try to add this same logic to any online content you create.

4. Tactile markers and audio announcements

We support the use of safe tactile indicators or markers and audible announcements to provide your members with information in non-visual formats. For example, using tactile floor markers to identify one-way systems in changing rooms.

5. Flexibility for guides

We understand that facilities will request that people workout by themselves or socially distance while participating in different activities. We hope that you’ll consider relaxing these provisions for people who are blind or partially sighted and allow them to participate with their own guide or carer.

6. Hygiene

For many blind and partially sighted members, identifying equipment can be a difficult and extremely tactile process. To maintain the required level of hygiene, specifically highlight to your blind and partially sighted members where and how they can sterilise their hands, equipment and any other facilities they may use.

Help people find facilities

 Covid 19 may have resulted in changes to facility layouts – this can be confusing if you can’t see too well. If someone looks lost – ask them and let them know where things are.

 

7. Protective screens

With the installation of protective screens within your facilities, it’s important to ensure there is good contrast, so they don’t create unnecessary confusion. This can be as simple as putting tape around the edge of the screen and payment terminal location.

 

8. Ask someone if they need help 

People appreciate being asked if they need help. If you think that someone needs help, just say hello and ask

 

 How to Interact

For more information on how to interact with your blind and partially sighted customers, please refer to RNIB’s “Helping you to help your customers” resource

https://www.rnib.org.uk/volunteering/helping-you-help-others-during-coronavirus

While there is much more to be learned by booking a practical training session with an RNIB expert, here are a few simple tools which could make the world of difference, and help you stand out from the crowd:

  • Introduce yourself and talk directly to the person you are helping
  • If you are going to guide them, let them take your arm, don’t grab theirs
  • Don’t walk away without saying you are leaving
  • Treat people with disabilities with respect and consideration
  • Be open to different communication styles
  • Don’t make assumptions about what type of disability, or disabilities, a person has
  • Remember, some disabilities are not visible. Take the time to get to know your customers’ needs
  • Ask before you offer to help — don’t just jump in. Customers with disabilities know if they need help and how you can provide it

To find out how RNIB Business could help you to better support your customers and employees who are living with sight loss, please contact our team at businesslink@rnib.org.uk or call 01733 375 370.

 

eLearning Course: Coaching People with a Visual Impairment

British Blind Sport and UK Coaching have created a new eLearning course 'Coaching People with a Visual Impairment'.

Coaching People with a Visual Impairment

British Blind Sport and UK Coaching have created a new eLearning course ‘Coaching People with a Visual Impairment’.

original article on britishblindsport.org.uk/

This new course raises awareness of the crucial role coaches’ play in helping people with visual impairments (VI) overcome barriers to participation in sport and physical activity, complementing UK Coaching’s ‘Person-centred’ principle of great coaching.

Tennis Coach, coaching two people with a visual impairment
Complete this course and you will feel more confident including people with a visual impairment in your sports and activity sessions.

Packed full of helpful tips, practical solutions and vibrant videos*, the 6 modules will increase your knowledge, assurance and skills to be able to coach people with a visual impairment.

“It’s really important the coach education starts at grassroots. There are still too many coaches who aren’t confident around visually impaired people.”

Sophie Thornhill, Paralympic Champion

  • Gain a greater understanding of sight loss and eye conditions
  • Explore practical solutions to barriers to participation and help meet individual needs
  • Explore some of the safety considerations to ensure a fully accessible and inclusive environment for people with a visual impairment
  • Learn how to make adaptations to specific elements of session planning and delivery using the STEP model
  • Understand how to communicate effectively and guide individual
  • Plus, you will be able to print out the UK Coaching and British Blind Sport certificate confirming you have completed the course
Coach guides a swimmer at the poolside.

 

Cost

£8.99 for non-BBS member and £5.99 for members after discount.

Please note: Members of British Blind Sport can enjoy a 33% discount on this course. To get your discount code, contact British Blind Sport on 01926 424 247 or email info@britishblindsport.org.uk

Ready to give it a try? Why not take a FREE Demo.

Accessibility

This course has been designed with accessibility in mind and has been rigorously tested. We aim to make the experience as accessible and easy to use as possible. This course works on desktop, tablets and mobile phones. For the best experience, we recommend you complete it on a desktop using Google Chrome.

If you have a visual impairment, we have designed the course to work with screen readers:

  • HTML5: JAWS 16 or later with Internet Explorer 10 or later, Google Chrome (latest version), Firefox (latest version)
  • Flash: JAWS 16 or later with Internet Explorer 11

Visit the UK Coaching website to take a FREE Demo of Coaching People with a Visual Impairment

* All videos come with downloadable manuscripts to illustrate the video in further detail along with audio descriptions where possible.

 

eLearning Course: Coaching People with a Visual Impairment

British Blind Sport and UK Coaching have created a new eLearning course 'Coaching People with a Visual Impairment'.

Coaching People with a Visual Impairment

British Blind Sport and UK Coaching have created a new eLearning course ‘Coaching People with a Visual Impairment’.

original article on britishblindsport.org.uk/

This new course raises awareness of the crucial role coaches’ play in helping people with visual impairments (VI) overcome barriers to participation in sport and physical activity, complementing UK Coaching’s ‘Person-centred’ principle of great coaching.

Tennis Coach, coaching two people with a visual impairment
Complete this course and you will feel more confident including people with a visual impairment in your sports and activity sessions.

Packed full of helpful tips, practical solutions and vibrant videos*, the 6 modules will increase your knowledge, assurance and skills to be able to coach people with a visual impairment.

“It’s really important the coach education starts at grassroots. There are still too many coaches who aren’t confident around visually impaired people.”

Sophie Thornhill, Paralympic Champion

  • Gain a greater understanding of sight loss and eye conditions
  • Explore practical solutions to barriers to participation and help meet individual needs
  • Explore some of the safety considerations to ensure a fully accessible and inclusive environment for people with a visual impairment
  • Learn how to make adaptations to specific elements of session planning and delivery using the STEP model
  • Understand how to communicate effectively and guide individual
  • Plus, you will be able to print out the UK Coaching and British Blind Sport certificate confirming you have completed the course
Coach guides a swimmer at the poolside.

 

Cost

£8.99 for non-BBS member and £5.99 for members after discount.

Please note: Members of British Blind Sport can enjoy a 33% discount on this course. To get your discount code, contact British Blind Sport on 01926 424 247 or email info@britishblindsport.org.uk

Ready to give it a try? Why not take a FREE Demo.

Accessibility

This course has been designed with accessibility in mind and has been rigorously tested. We aim to make the experience as accessible and easy to use as possible. This course works on desktop, tablets and mobile phones. For the best experience, we recommend you complete it on a desktop using Google Chrome.

If you have a visual impairment, we have designed the course to work with screen readers:

  • HTML5: JAWS 16 or later with Internet Explorer 10 or later, Google Chrome (latest version), Firefox (latest version)
  • Flash: JAWS 16 or later with Internet Explorer 11

Visit the UK Coaching website to take a FREE Demo of Coaching People with a Visual Impairment

* All videos come with downloadable manuscripts to illustrate the video in further detail along with audio descriptions where possible.

 

BBS Guide Running Resources

Guide Running resources including a British Blind Sports Video

Below is a new resource to help clubs and volunteers to more effectively assist visually impaired people by acting as guide runners.

The video gives advice to potential guide runners on how to make guiding an enjoyable and safe activity for everyone involved!

Guide running video below

Find a Guide runner

For more information on guide running or to find a guide runner, please visit www.findaguide.co.uk

Guide Running Merchandise

For guide running merchandise, such as tethers and bibs, please visit our online store at https://britishblindsport.org.uk/product-category/products/

British Blind Sport Website:  https://britishblindsport.org.uk/

BBS Activity Finder: https://britishblindsport.org.uk/activity-finder/