Metro Blind and VI Tennis Restarting 16 & 18 Sept!

Metro Blind and VI Tennis Restarting: 16 - 18 Sept 2020 Booking Required!

Blind and VI Tennis at the Islington Tennis Centre on Wednesdays and Fridays – Booking  is required

We are very happy to say that our Sessions for our blind members and for blind or partially people who are new to the game, will occur on Fortnightly on Wednesday’s and sessions for partially sighted players will occur Fortnightly on Friday’s.

New Tennis Arrangments with ITC- Please read

Download -Word: http://blindsport.uk/ITCTennisA

Please check the Event details link below

Event details

 

Latest Tennis Dates: 

  • Learn Blind Tennis:  Wed  16, 30  Sept, 14, 25 Oct,  11, 25 Nov,  9 Dec
  • Practice VI Tennis:  Fri  18 Sept  2, 16, 30 Oct,  13, 27 Nov, 11 Dec

Time: 6 pm to 8 pm   Booking required

Venue: Islington Tennis Centre, Market Road, London, N7 9PL

Cost: £4 for members   £8 for non-members

To Book  use tennis event page below
https://blindsport.uk/tennisevents

Meet and greet is available to and from Caledonian Road Tube Station by arrangement.

Contact: Charlie Email  charlie.raven@metroblindsport.org or call 07956292046

New Tennis Arrangments with ITC- Please read

Download -Word: http://blindsport.uk/ITCTennisA

 

 

Rising Phoenix: a documentary about the Paralympic Games movement

Rising Phoenix: a documentary about the Paralympic Games movement

Rising Phoenix: a documentary about the Paralympic Games movement

Original article from disabilityhorizons.com

Paralympian’s hail the launch of ground-breaking movie Rising Phoenix, which features the story of the Paralympic Games movement to coincide with one-year-to-go celebrations for Tokyo 2020.

Rising Phoenix: Official Trailer below

Trailblazing Paralympics documentary ‘Rising Phoenix’ streams globally in over 190 countries on Netflix to coincide with the one-year-to-go celebrations for the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games, which were pushed back a year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Featuring nine Paralympians from across the world, this cutting-edge movie tells the remarkable story of the Paralympic Games from the rubble of World War II until becoming the third biggest sporting event on the planet.

‘Rising Phoenix’ examines how the Paralympics have sparked a global movement throughout the decades and shows how it continues to change the way the world thinks about disability, excellence, diversity and human potential.

The athletes starring in Rising Phoenix  

Nine Paralympic athletes including Bebe Vio, Jean-Baptiste Alaize, Cui Zhe, Tatyana McFadden and Great Britain’s Jonnie Peacock, share their exceptional stories of skill, power and determination to make it to the top of the third biggest sporting event in the world.

Jonnie Peacock - Paralympic Games
Multiple-swimming Paralympic champion Ellie Cole from Australia strongly believes ‘Rising Phoenix’ will help take the Movement in to the next level.

Multiple-swimming Paralympic champion Ellie Cole from Australia strongly believes ‘Rising Phoenix’ will help take the Movement in to the next level.

“When I see a piece of work like this one, and especially something that a brand like Netflix is taking up, I think back to when I was 9 or 10 years old and not knowing that Para sport even existed,” she said.

“I’ve seen the evolution to what it has become to the point where there’s a Netflix documentary and that is something else. It makes me proud because I’ve seen it change so dramatically. I know what it used to be like.

“I think people who watch the film, particularly those who aren’t fans already, are going to finally understand that the Paralympic Movement is really multi-dimensional. It’s actually so cool.”

South African Paralympic athletics silver medallist Ntando Mahlangu is one of the rising Paralympic stars, having made a name for himself at the young age of 18 following many successes on the track.

He agrees with Ellie that this documentary is an example of sport’s power for uniting the world.

“What is definitely in my heart is the story of the Paralympians. I think this is a platform where people will learn about the Paralympics and this is what I wanted.

“People are going to start supporting Paralympics, people are going to start knowing what the Paralympics are, so it’s going to be a good platform for everyone in the Paralympics.

Born without arms, archer Matt Stutzman is a well-known name in the Paralympics with his unique feet-shooting style.

The 37-year-old from Team USA athlete: “I think (the movie) is trying to bring awareness to everyone who is watching. Yes, we have physical disabilities but that does not stop us. We can still live normal lives; we can still be the person who goes to the grocery store and gets food. We can live like everybody else.

At the same time, wheelchair rugby legend Ryley Batt wishes he could watch ‘Rising Phoenix’ together with his grandfather. “I was by myself the first time I saw Rising Phoenix, and it even had me in tears. My Pop knows he was a big influence on my life but God, he would be proud to see this.

“Pop loved to get behind the camera, and he filmed some of the footage you see in the movie. He was very proud of me and he would be really stoked that I’m in a documentary like that, embracing who I am.

“I watched the movie for the second time with my family and they were all in tears. It wasn’t tears of ‘I feel so sorry for you.’ It was tears of pride, seeing what myself and these other athletes have overcome and also the challenges that we’ve all accepted.”

Rising Phoenix soundtrack created by disabled artists

As well as Paralympians featuring in this film, the music is created and performed by people with disabilities too.

The directors of Rising Phoenix, Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui, were reluctant to have a well-known musician feature on the soundtrack. Speaking to Variety, Ian said:

“we were very reluctant to have a big name because we’ve got a film full of athletes who should be household names, and yet none of these people are famous. It felt wrong to have a big-name singer finish the film off.”

Fortunately, composer Daniel Pemberton discovered three American rappers, part of Krip-Hop Nation, “a loose-knit scene of disabled hip-hop artists,” Pemberton tells Variety, “quite a fascinating world, very overlooked and underground.

The three American rappers – George TraGiC and Keith Jones, who both have cerebral palsy and Toni Hickman, whose right side is now partially paralyzed after two brain aneurysms and a stroke – wrote lyrics that reflect the film and their own experiences living with a disability.

Daniel also had support creating the film score by three disabled musicians; viola and violin player Gemma Lunt and French hornist Guy Llewellyn, who are both wheelchair users, and visually impaired soprano Joanne Roughton-Arnold.

The title track from the film Rising Phoenix, scored by Daniel Pemberton and performed by Krip Hop Nation, is available to download from all major online outlets.

Rising Phoenix is available to watch on Netflix now.

By Emma Purcell

Celebrating 10 years of Goalball UK – Croysutt Warriors

A catch up with Croysutt Warriors

Group photo of members of Croysutt Warriors, including Tommy, Sally, and Robin.

Original article by goalballuk.com

This month we caught up with Tommy and Sally Britton and Robin Faulkner – three of the people behind the London based Croysutt Warriors, who have become one of the biggest goalball clubs in the UK.

The story of how Croysutt Warriors became one of the most active goalball clubs in the country starts with Robin Faulkner. Robin is the chair of the largest table tennis club in Croydon, South Croydon Table Tennis Club, in 2014 he was approached to be a community sport partner for Streetgames, the initiative that uses sport to create positive change in the lives of disadvantaged people.

“Streetgames is a fantastic cause and I loved being involved with the project. I helped to modify versions of sports that can be delivered everywhere without a formal setting. As part of the ongoing work we were looking for sports that were truly inclusive and after some research we discovered goalball, which fitted the bill perfectly.

The story of how Croysutt Warriors became one of the most active goalball clubs in the country starts with Robin Faulkner. Robin is the chair of the largest table tennis club in Croydon, South Croydon Table Tennis Club, in 2014 he was approached to be a community sport partner for Streetgames, the initiative that uses sport to create positive change in the lives of disadvantaged people.

“Streetgames is a fantastic cause and I loved being involved with the project. I helped to modify versions of sports that can be delivered everywhere without a formal setting. As part of the ongoing work we were looking for sports that were truly inclusive and after some research we discovered goalball, which fitted the bill perfectly.

“The main purpose was to establish a goalball club in Croydon and ensure its sustainability, but at the time, we had little idea how that might be achieved! So, in 2014, I reached out to Goalball UK and Alex Bunney really helped us to get the ball rolling with a few taster sessions. It only took two months before we hosted our first session and Alex encouraged us to start doing them fortnightly.

“The early sessions were patchy for numbers, but my philosophy with these things is to provide consistency. I don’t believe that if at one session no one turns up – which we did have – then the next session should be cancelled. This is particularly true when dealing with any group of differently abled people. They need time to be comfortable with the venue, the travel and the atmosphere before they will be willing to commit to a longer-term relationship with a club or organisation. We persevered and along came Tommy Britton.”

At this time, it was not long since Tommy Britton had lost his sight, and with that, his career as a chef. Tommy recalls that at the time he was in a bad place and was seriously struggling with his mental health.

“I found my visual impairment very isolating and became quite reclusive. I was in a physical slump. That was before I had contact with my rehabilitation officer for the visually impaired, Greg, who pulled me out of the mire. It was he who nagged me into trying goalball. It took a little while for me to finally attend a session. But as soon as I did, from the first ball I became absolutely hooked by the sport and I couldn’t get enough of it.

“At the beginning, one of the most amazing things that I found about the sport was that it was helping me to relearn old skills which I lost with my sight. It’s stuff that we can take for granted, like being confident enough to take public transport alone. But the belief I got from playing goalball gave me the determination to become more independent.

“It was at these taster sessions that I met Robin, who has become a really good friend. He inspired me to work with him to help get the club off the ground as it was evident the positive impact that goalball has for visually impaired people. I wanted everyone that was like me to experience the benefits of this sport.”

After playing goalball for a while, Tommy encouraged his family to get involved with Croysutt Warriors. Now his wife Sally and daughter Tiffany-Jade, who are both sighted, play alongside him.

Sally recalls, “It was really emotional seeing Tommy develop into a good goalball player and watching him grow stronger by the day, like the man he was before the tough times started. We both believe that without goalball, he would have not retrained professionally to become a psychologist and set up his own business.

“I love playing alongside my husband and daughter, it has been great for our family. It has made us even closer and it has also given me an insight into his life and the impact it had on him. Goalball has also been massively important for Tiffany-Jade, who has a form of autism. The sport has taught her so many new skills that have really helped her with day to day life.”

With the Brittons on board and Robin as chairman, Croysutt Warriors have continued to go from strength to strength. They entered their first tournament in September 2015 and have since had teams in every national competition they have been eligible for.

Along the way, Croysutt Warriors were the novice shield winners in 2016/17 and 2018/19, the Regional C South and East winners 2018/19, and collected a number of gold, silver and bronze medals at intermediate level, along with several individual honours. Whilst in the novice leagues, the produced a magnificent unbroken streak of six gold medals.

Croysutt Warriors have also performed on the international stage at the Malmö Open. They won all but one match and their team had the tournament’s top – and record for the competition – goal scorer Jack Peters.

“The progression the club has made makes me really proud.” Robin says. “However, what is really special is witnessing the journey our players go on. Most are timid and hesitant at first, but they often blossom into more confident, fitter, happier people who are at ease with their different ability. This is at the heart of what we’re doing.”

For Tommy, being part of a club that is developing into a real asset to his hometown and community is something that he is particularly proud of.

“This club continues to amaze me. We have gone above and beyond what we thought would be possible and we continue to outgrow ourselves. A real indication of how far we have come is that people around here know who we are and what goalball is. Even a few years ago we couldn’t have imagined that. The inclusive community aspect of the club is massively important to me – we want the club to be accessible to everyone. Regardless of age, ability or level of sight, we want people to come along, have a good time and make some new friends.

“We estimate that so far we have had around 70 different people from the local area either play for Croysutt Warriors or attend training. Considering that we started a few years ago from nothing, this is massive for us. However, we know that there are so many more people out there that could really benefit from our club, so the hard work continues to reach these people and encourage them to have a go. To do this, we have also been ramping up our fundraising efforts.”

As the club has continued to evolve and the networking in the community has grown, Sally has become more involved on the operations side of the club and is now the treasurer.

“I’ve experienced first-hand what a goalball club can do to someone’s wellbeing, so I was really eager to help out in any way that I could so that we can be there for more people. Our main goal is to keep going with the great progress we have made so far. For me personally, this experience has given me a new outlook and I try to help out in the community in other ways too. For instance, last Christmas we took the time to help the homeless and I provided haircuts at the local crisis centre.”

With Croysutt Warriors now firmly established as a flagship goalball club, the team now moves on to the next stage of its development. Robin says, “We must consolidate our gains so far and provide succession planning for the future. The aim is to continue to make steady progress and we want to have at least two competitive teams at every level the game is played at domestically. It is also really important for us to continue to spread the sport throughout our region and increase the work we do in schools.

“That’s not to say that we do not have big ambitions for Croysutt Warriors and the sport. I think the dream for all of us is to one day help to create a dedicated goalball centre in the South East.”

 

National Guidance to Support Safe Sighted Guiding

National Guidance to Support Safe Sighted Guiding

National Guidance to Support Safe Sighted Guiding

The Department for Health and Social Care, DHSC, has on the second September issued its guidance below, Supporting people outside of their home, assisting people who may have had problems going out on their own while maintaining social distancing:

This General guidance applies to England only and outlines how the Coronavirus, COVID-19, transmission risk can be minimised when support is provided so that people can visit shops, socialise or exercise safely. The guidance states that where you need support from someone Who isn’t in your household or support bubble and is not your normal carer, you and the person providing the support should, where possible, keep 1 m away from each other, taking additional precautions:

  • Keeping any interactions of closer than 2 metres distance to as short a time as possible.
  • Trying to avoid face to face contact with the person supporting you. Side by side contact is preferable and if face to face contact is needed, this should be for as short a time as possible.
  • Wearing a face covering unless you are unable to or exempt from wearing one, if you’re going to be supported indoors or get close contact support for extended periods indoors or outdoors.

You may be part of a larger gathering but the same person, or people if you need support from more than one person at a time, should support you at all times. The guidance also states you may receive support from voluntary organisations or when accessing businesses such as larger shops, train stations or a hospital clinic, where the person providing the support may be helping multiple people in a day. When asking for support, you should set out what support you need and provide your name & contact details.

RNIB has also just published more detailed joint policy guidance on sighted guiding assistance for VIPs, in partnership with Guide Dogs & TPT

This is based on the DHSC guidance above, allowing for sighted guiding support from family or friends not in your household or support bubble and by volunteers or staff from organisations such as supermarkets, transport hubs and hospitals.

Sighted guiding ordinarily involves the person being guided keeping light contact with a guider’s elbow, standing alongside and slightly behind to the left or right, depending on personal preference.

The RNIB policy lead I’ve been liaising with tells me they’ve tried with a few people and if you’re measuring head to head, you should be able to keep 1 m or so apart from when guiding using the elbow.

Although guiding has a number of factors that make it a little safer in any event, you’re usually outdoors and moving and side to side, rather than face to face, all of which help mitigate the risk. At the same time, they’re also aware that you’re likely to be involved for more than 15 minutes, which adds to the risk somewhat.

They’ve recommended the additional mitigations, particularly with people outside your household or support bubble, of wearing a face covering, good hand and respiratory hygiene as well as planning journeys to reduce the risks as far as is practical.

For people who were clinically vulnerable or extremely vulnerable, current government guidance is that they are able to be supported to leave their house but these people are reminded to be scrupulous in following the guidance, given their vulnerability.

As with all of this, this is subject to changes in regulations, so if there is a local lockdown people will have to observe any new restrictions until they are lifted.

 

BBS Archery AGM 10th Sept 2020

British Blind Sport's Archery AGM 10th Sept 2020

The BBS Archery AGM will be held on Zoom this year on Thursday 10th September 2020 at 6:30pm.

The meeting ID 722 326 2428

the passcode is 1234.

The link to the meeting is https://zoom.us/j/7223262428

As previously mentioned, you can join online, using a mobile app, desktop/laptop app or by dialling from a mobile or landline.

The link is live now if you want to try and connect and test your equipment for the meeting.

If you get to a screen that says “Please wait for the host to start this meeting” then you are ready to go.

If you wish to join by phone, the phone numbers are below:

0203 901 7895

0208 080 6591

0208 080 6592

A one tap link if you are dialling in from a mobile phone here

+442039017895,,7223262428#,,,,,,0#,,1234#

Graham Rees-Evans –  Chair  BBS Archery