Monthly Archives: April 2017

 Extant presents “Catching the Ghost! by Chris Campion!

Extant presents "Catching the Ghost! by Chris Campion!
Venue:
The Arches at St Mary's Church, Putney
Time:
3.00pm - 3.50pm
Phone:
0208 871 5545
Date:
20th May 2017
Cost:
£10 /£8 concessions


Catching the Ghost by Chris Campion

 is Part of the Wandsworth Arts Fringe and Brighton Fringe Festivals!

“I remember lying on my roof, utterly bewildered and for the first time sensed the ghost. Felt him separate from my body. The ghost of the Chris that didn’t break, that didn’t lose his sight.”

Follow the journey of Chris, a young man who must suddenly confront his struggle with sight loss in a whole new light. Told with honesty, dark humour, music, and occasionally just falling over for a cheap laugh.

This is the debut play from actor and musician, Chris Campion. Developed and produced by Extant, the UK’s leading performing arts company of visually impaired artists.

Make sure you catch Chris and the team in either Wandsworth or Brighton this May. Dates and venue details below…

The Arches at St Mary’s Church, Putney | Part of #FragilityTakeover at Wandsworth Arts Fringe

Dates: Saturday 20 May at 3pm and Sunday 21 May at 5pm

Book tickets here or call 0208 871 5545

And check out some of Chris’ original music as Shadow Stitcher on his Facebook and Reverb Nation pages!

 Extant presents “Catching the Ghost! by Chris Campion!

Extant presents "Catching the Ghost! by Chris Campion!
Venue:
The Arches at St Mary's Church, Putney
Time:
5.00pm - 5.50pm
Phone:
0208 871 5545
Date:
21st May 2017
Cost:
£10 /£8 concessions


Catching the Ghost by Chris Campion

 is Part of the Wandsworth Arts Fringe and Brighton Fringe Festivals!

“I remember lying on my roof, utterly bewildered and for the first time sensed the ghost. Felt him separate from my body. The ghost of the Chris that didn’t break, that didn’t lose his sight.”

Follow the journey of Chris, a young man who must suddenly confront his struggle with sight loss in a whole new light. Told with honesty, dark humour, music, and occasionally just falling over for a cheap laugh.

This is the debut play from actor and musician, Chris Campion. Developed and produced by Extant, the UK’s leading performing arts company of visually impaired artists.

Make sure you catch Chris and the team in either Wandsworth or Brighton this May. Dates and venue details below…

The Arches at St Mary’s Church, Putney | Part of #FragilityTakeover at Wandsworth Arts Fringe

Date:  Sunday 21 May at 5pm

Book tickets here or call 0208 871 5545

And check out some of Chris’ original music as Shadow Stitcher on his Facebook and Reverb Nation pages!

British Team Announced for first ever International Blind Tennis Tournament!

Brenda Cassell British Team 2017

Six tennis players have been selected for the Great Britain team to contest the International Blind Tennis Tournament in Spain next month, becoming the first ever visually impaired players to represent the nation on the international stage.

The team will be managed by the Tennis Foundation, Great Britain’s leading tennis charity, and will travel to Alfaz del Pí on the Costa Blanca, Alicante for what is the first ever international tournament of its kind.

Organised by the International Blind Tennis Association, the tournament will see 70 players from 14 countries take part.  As a result, at the end of the event, the first ever blind tennis world rankings will be established.

The Great Britain team is comprised of three female and three male players:

  • Yvette Priestley – Birmingham
  • Wendy Glasper – Darlington
  • Brenda Cassell – Leytonstone, London
  • Nikhil Nair  – Cambridge
  • David Deas  – Newcastle
  • Chris Baily – Uckfield

 

British Vision Impaired tennis team 2017 - individual photo montage  ©Tennis Foundation
British Vision Impaired tennis team 2017 – individual photo montage ©Tennis Foundation

Great Britain Team Manager and the Tennis Foundation’s Tournament Director, Kirsty Thomson said

“We’re so proud to be involved in the first international Blind Tennis event. Blind and Visually Impaired Tennis is continually growing as a sport. With the chance for players to now secure a world ranking, as well as compete domestically in the Tennis Foundation structure of regional tournaments and National Championships, it can only continue to go from strength to strength. We hope the selected GB players will inspire the next generation to pick up a racket at one of the many sessions supported by the Tennis Foundation across the country.”

Great Britain player Nikhil Nair, blind since the age of nine, is no stranger to breaking boundaries, having become Cambridge University’s first ever blind science student and graduated with a double first in 1997.  A member of the Vision4Growth club in Cambridge and singles finalist at the National Championships for the past three years, Nair said: “I’ve been dreaming about playing international blind tennis since my first National Championships, so to get that chance now really is a dream come true – as well as an incredible privilege.  I’m absolutely delighted to be in the GB team”

Brenda Cassell a Metro Blind Sport member has played VI cricket and then someone in her team suggested she should try tennis.  Since starting to play she has gained confidence in herself and feels proud just being able to play tennis let alone compete.

“Playing for GB is beyond any dream.  Wow somebody pinch me!  This is a huge honour and I am truly humbled.  Go GB!”                                       

“I’m looking forward to walking out on the court in my GB gear and meeting other VI players from around the world – and hoping to bring home the winner’s trophy!”

There are more opportunities than ever before for people who are blind or partially sighted to play tennis  – and a record number of people are now taking it up, with a 165% increase in participation over the last three years at the Tennis Foundation’s network of venues.

With ambitions to become a Paralympic sport in the future, the visually impaired version of tennis is adapted from the full court version to a smaller court, with lower a lower net. It also uses an audible ball so players can hear it bounce and being hit, and, depending on an individual’s sight level, they can also be allowed up to three bounces before they must return it back to their opponent.

The Tennis Foundation’s vision is to make tennis a sport which is inclusive and accessible to all.  It is hoped that in sending a Great Britain team to the first ever International Blind Tennis Tournament it will help raise the profile and awareness of visually impaired tennis in this country and inspire more people to play tennis in the UK, whatever their disability.

The Tennis Foundation works to open up tennis to its priority audiences of disabled people, young people in education and people in lower socio-economic communities, making it possible for them to enjoy the many health and social benefits of the sport whilst maximising their personal potential.

As part of its disability work, the Tennis Foundation supports and promotes visually impaired tennis in Great Britain, including delivering tennis taster sessions at the majority of the British Blind Sport ‘Have a Go Days’ to help blind and partially sighted people to try out the game, subsidising camps to help players develop their skill, and running a series of regional and national tournaments for blind and partially sighted players of all abilities, junior and senior.

Anyone interested in finding out more about tennis for blind and partially sighted tennis can download the Tennis Foundation’s ‘Guide to Visually Impaired Tennis via http://bit.ly/VITennisGuide.  To find out more about the work of the Tennis Foundation visit www.tennisfoundation.org.uk.

 

New £3.3 million programme supporting young Disabled Londoners into employment

Bridge to Work

 originally Posted by: Inclusion London in DDPO news on 18 April 2017

City Bridge Trust’s Bridge to Work programme is funding Inclusion London and other organisations over the next three years to help open up employment opportunities for young Disabled Londoners.

A multi-million-pound programme designed to open up a wealth of employment opportunities for young Disabled Londoners has been announced.

City Bridge Trust pledged its commitment to narrowing the employment gap for young Disabled people in the capital with a new £3.3million fund for organisations tackling the issue.

Over the next three years, the Bridge to Work Programme will provide money for projects which offer employability support for young Disabled people, and strengthen links between employers and the Disabled community.

Inclusion London is one of the organisations invited to take part, alongside Action on Disability, Action for Kids, National Autistic Society, Muscular Dystrophy UK and Whizz-Kidz.

Within the £3.3 million, a pot of £350,000 will be made available to support paid work experience and internships for young Disabled Londoners in charities and the private sector – with an emphasis on SMEs.

Employment rates have risen steadily in the capital over the last ten years. However, only half of working age Disabled people in London are in employment, compared to nearly four out of five non-disabled people.

Bridge to Work will focus its support on projects aimed at helping young Disabled people between the ages of 16-30 and plans to be fully up and running by September this year.

The programme has three main aims:

  • Supporting Disabled people aged 16-30 into paid employment.
  • Sustaining Disabled people in paid employment – through advice, support and developing good practice.
  • Strengthening the links between potential employers and Disabled young Londoners, including improving recruitment processes.

Beyond the initial outcomes delivered by the projects supported, the aim is to use learning from these projects to better inform commissioners, policy makers, and other funders.

Following the recent release of the green paper from the Department for Work and Pensions on the disability employment gap, it is hoped that this work funded by the Trust will have a positive influence on future government policy.

Alison Gowman, Chairman of the City of London Corporation’s City Bridge Trust committee, said:

“The organisations we are supporting through this new programme will really transform lives through their projects.

“We will be funding work which will give employers the support, skills and resources they need to increase opportunities for Disabled people.

“The programme has a wider mission and is looking to influence policy in this area and make real change for the better.”

 

Blind Tennis Session – Islington Tennis Centre – Fri 21 July!

Islington Blind Tennis banner 2017 Monica hitting the ball
Venue:
Islington Tennis Centre (ITC), Market Road, London, N7 9PL.
Time:
6.00pm - 8.00pm
Phone:
N/A
Date:
21st July 2017
Cost:
The first session is FREE £4 for Members £8 Non-Members


Islington Blind Tennis  Session 

  • First Session is FREE
  •  £4 for Members
  • £8 Non-Members

Venue: Islington Tennis Centre (ITC), Market Road, London, N7 9PL.

  • 3 courts on Fridays

Important! if you are a Totally Blind  or a beginner Tennis player and you want to be met at the station please let the contact below know by Wednesday for the Friday Session

Metro would always advise to phone or email the event contacts to confirm there have been no last minute changes or cancellations.

For more information contact: Odette Battarel  Email: odetteb@pocklington-trust.org.uk
or Amanda Green: amanda.green@metroblindsport.org 

If  you want to try volunteering for Blind tennis, please Contact: Linda Almond
Email:  almondall@aol.com

Blind Tennis

Is often called Soundball Tennis and is played on either a badminton court or a standard tennis court using a junior tennis racket and an adapted sponge ball that makes a noise when it bounces. Balls can be either black or florescent yellow to give maximum contrast with the colour of the sports hall. Blind Tennis video link here

Want to know more about Blind Tennis?

To find out more about what we offer or to get involved, contact Email: odetteb@pocklington-trust.org.uk

You can watch a video of Odette being interviewed about Sound Ball Tennis at the link below: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGOjB5ZVSj4

Latest VI Advisory Groups agreed  Blind Tennis Rule below

Download: the full VI Tennis Advisory Group Document below
Feedback Word document here

See rules for more info.

Read about the Metro Annual Tennis Tournament 2013 and a new players perspective by clicking on ‘Articles’ in the Quicklinks box on this page. For an umpire’s view of the 2012 Tournament, Visit: http://www.csp.org.uk/frontline/article/viewpoint-tennis-anyone

Watch a video on Metro the Tennis Foundation website of metro members playing at the National Tennis Centre

To read about Miyoshi Takei, the inventor of blind tennis, visit:http://www.hanno.jp/matsui/